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Democratic equality. Are Rawls's principles of economic justice too egalitarian or not egalitarian enough?

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AUCUNE
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IEP RENNES

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Clara Z.
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documents in English
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  1. Introduction
  2. Rawls's egalitarianism
  3. D. Parfit's Equality or Priority
  4. The theoretical argumentation
  5. G.A. Cohen's 're'-interpretation of the difference principle
  6. The 'ethos' of justice
  7. Conclusion
  8. Sources

The question is, therefore, whether Rawls's egalitarianism is not enough egalitarian or too egalitarian. After having exposed the main points of Rawls's view of economic justice, the analysis of its major criticisms, both from the left and the right sides, is necessary to bring out the very meaning of Rawls's egalitarianism.

[...] The question is, therefore, whether Rawls's egalitarianism is not enough egalitarian or too egalitarian. After having exposed the main points of Rawls's view of economic justice, the analysis of its major criticisms, both from the left and the right sides, is necessary to bring out the very meaning of Rawls's egalitarianism. For J. Rawls, ?democratic equality? refers to the particular way in which his second principle of justice, composed by the fair equality of opportunity and the difference principle, combined two distinct egalitarian issues. [...]


[...] As departure from equality is necessary only if and because talented individuals do not adjust their behaviour to the demands of the conception of justice?(G.A. Cohen, The Pareto argument for inequality), an ?egalitarian ethos? of justice, that forbid purely self-serving motivations, should be introduce in Rawls's theory. Such an of justice should avoid situations in which egoistical individuals are free to demand incentives-generating inequalities, or in which the family scheme does not comply with the fair equality of opportunity of the females. The of justice should govern what for J. Rawls are private choices. [...]


[...] People under such a veil of ignorance would accept two liberal egalitarian principles of justice. The first one is that ?each person is to have an equal right to the most extensive system of equal basic liberties?. These principle should have the priority over the second one, which defends that ?social and economic inequalities must be to the greatest benefit to the least advantaged?. As N. Daniels stresses it, ?equality is the component of (Rawls's view of) social cooperation? (Democratic Equality, Rawls's complex egalitarianism). [...]

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