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Death of a Salesman, by Arthur Miller

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  1. Introduction
  2. The explosion of urban violence
  3. Exclusion reinforced by a negative stigma
  4. The violence expressed by riots in France and the violence in the 1960's in Los Angeles
  5. Conclusion
  6. Sources

Since the very beginning of the play, we realize the essential role of dreams and reminiscences in Willy Loman's life because he seems to live in his own world. Indeed, as soon as he comes back home, we learn that this day, he wasn't able to drive all the way to the place he was supposed to go working. In fact, the car kept going off on to the shoulder because he couldn't stop dreaming and didn't manage to be concentrated enough on the road. He explains that he was looking at the scenery and had strange thoughts. At this point, we can assume that even if he is disturbed by his dreams, he is conscious of the frontier between his dreams and reality. However, we quickly realize that this is not true because he confesses, then, that he is sure he was driving his red Chevvy this day, whereas he replaced this old car a long time ago.

[...] It does lead to an over presence of the state in French cites whereas American ghettoes are desertified by the state. In addition, people living in projects in the Red and in the Black belt are experiencing a different position as far as the labor market is concerned. American inhabitants of projects are still integrated but only marginalized as ?working poors' in the labor market while French inhabitants of banlieues are touched by long term unemployment that completely separates them from the labor market. [...]


[...] If it can be said that both ghettoes share some morphological features highlighted by the phenomenon of riots in France, it cannot be denied that Wacquant's contrast is still relevant. Secondly, it must be argued that even if the French riots seem invalid to Wacquant's contrast, in fact this account is still valid and can also be emphasized by the French riots. Indeed, if saying that projects in USA and France have morphological similarities might be true, it cannot be simplified to argue that the exactly same phenomenon is taking place in both areas. [...]

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