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The connection between Blanche DuBois and Sex

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Luella F.
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case study
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4 pages
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  1. Introduction
  2. Review
  3. Conclusion

There is no doubt when it comes to Blanche Dubois' state of mind. On the first look she seems fragile, lost, and of course delusional. But on a further examination it becomes apparent that there is more than what meets the eye. To put it aptly, Blanche Dubois is insecure, and wants to feel needed by someone. The way she fulfills this feeling, is through sex. Starting from the incident that led her to her promiscuous ways, to her hopeful but failed to escape, and her own birthday, Blanche cannot get away from sex. It follows her wherever she goes.

Two events, both regarding Allan Gray, have played a great role in Blanche's promiscuity. The first is when she caught him together with another man. The play doesn't go into much detail except that she found them ?in the worst of all possible ways? (p.68) which most likely is them having sex. From what Blanche tells Mitch, she ?failed?[Allan] in some mysterious way?(p.67) it is almost like Blanche feels as if the reason for him being a homosexual was due to her not being able to satisfy him. Then there's the guilt that she drove Allan to suicide. The last song they danced to, the Varsouviana, is heard throughout the play in Blanche's head. It is a sign that she is forever haunted by his death. To Blanche, she believed that she not only drove Allan to homosexuality, she drove him to his suicide by telling him ?I know! I saw! You disgust me!? (p.68). She feels that her disapproval made him ashamed of the way he was.

[...] The only time it isn't is when she is at the mental institution. All her life, ever since her days at the Hotel Flamingo, she had been haunted by sex. When she tried to escape it, she walked right back into it. When Stanley raped her, and her sister sided with him, it was the last straw. She had finally been consumed by sex, it over powered her. No longer could she live in ?both illusion and reality simultaneously? (Bak, 12). [...]


[...] The failed relationship with Allan made Blanche feel insecure, unwanted even. As a result, she had a ?fear of loneliness and abandonment? due to the ?disturbance of early object relationship.?(Bak, 11). To fill the loneliness, she turned to sleeping with men, in order to feel wanted. Her ?conflict between gentility and promiscuity? (Bak, 11) was skewed, since she left behind her morals just so that she could have several minutes of feeling needed with men who could actually care less for her. [...]

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