Search icone
Search and publish your papers
Our Guarantee
We guarantee quality.
Find out more!

Apocalyptic rhetoric and its effect on religious identity

Or download with : a doc exchange

About the author

 
Level
General public
Study
humanities/...
School/University
Boston...

About the document

Andrew T.
Published date
Language
documents in English
Format
Word
Type
case study
Pages
9 pages
Level
General public
Accessed
0 times
Validated by
Committee Oboolo.com
0 Comment
Rate this document
  1. Introduction
  2. Functional definitions of apocalypticism
  3. The symbolic practices
  4. The question of evil in apocalyptic texts
  5. The temple in apocalyptic text
  6. The similitudes of Enoch
  7. The law in apocalyptic literature
  8. Judgment in apocalyptic literature
  9. Conclusion
  10. Bibliography

Apocalypticism offers a unique rhetoric of violence. Israelite people experienced violence and domination for centuries under the control of Persians, Greeks, Selucids, Ptolemies, and Roman rulers. Israelite identity was challenged under these occupying forces because the God of Israel was a national God occupying a spatial existence in the Jerusalem Temple. The sovereignty of God and the holiness of the Temple must have been called to question when Jerusalem fell to the dominion of outside empires. In their reality of oppression, evil has broken into the world and divine power must have been thwarted or opposed to explain the suffering of their day. Apocalypticism springs out of this reality to offer solace and hope to the Israelite people while preserving cultic identity.Apocalyptic literature develops a complex and nuanced understanding of how evil entered the world in a cosmic manner. Evil not only is unethical behavior, but a cosmic force which corrupts reality. Paolo Sacchi, scholar of apocalyptic literature, developed an understanding of the genre through understanding the question of evil. ?The underlying problem is the origin of evil, and the distinctively apocalyptic solution lies in the idea that evil is prior to human will and is the result of an original sin that has irredeemably corrupted creation.? Apocalypticism deals with the corruption of evil in many ways because apocalypticism was not only a genre of literature, but also a worldview and a social force in the ancient near east. Communities formed based on apocalypticism, such as the Qumran community and the Jesus movement. These communities lived a reality where the problems of evil were understood through apocalyptic rhetoric and patterned their lives in response to this worldview.

[...] C. Kee, "Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs," in The Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, ed. James H. Charlesworth, 775-828 (New York: Doubleday, 1983) John Collins, The Apocalyptic Imagination, 139-140. John Collins, The Apocalyptic Imagination,168-170. Ibid Tom Thatcher, ?Empty Metaphors and Apocalyptic Rhetoric? G. Vermes, The Dead Sea Scrolls: Qumran in Perspective (Philadelphia: Fortress Pess, 1981). Carol A Newsom, "Apocalyptic and the Discourse of the Qumran Community," 138. John Collins, The Apocalyptic Imagination, 216-217. Ibid., 182-183. [...]


[...] The genre of apocalyptic literature offers a few differing understandings of the Law. Amongst the entirety of the genre, the mandate of the Law is righteous living and following proper instruction based on divine will. How differing documents work out justice and human agency for wisdom in the rhetoric shows difference. Even in the Similitudes where human wisdom is held in low esteem, righteousness still matters a great deal to Israelite identity. Judgment in Apocalyptic Literature Apocalyptic literature addresses theodicy and God's sovereignty in light of the existence of suffering. [...]


[...] While there are similarities between apocalyptic communities, there are also differences and disagreements about the role and purpose of the Temple, of priestly castes, and the law. An examination of the discourse on the topics of the question of evil, the Temple, the law, and judgment in apocalyptic documents will shed light on Israelite identity in the second century BCE through the second century CE. The Question of Evil in Apocalyptic Texts Definitions of apocalyptic literature and apocalyptic communities rest on eschatological judgment and suffering in a present reality. [...]


[...] For humans there is a trifold judgment. Those who are righteous are delivered. Those who sinned on earth but who died due to their sin are killed. Those who sinned on earth but remained unpunished receive torment for their actions. This rights the cosmic scale to give fitting punishments for all who transgressed against the divine law. Judgment in this document appears to be less harsh on humans compared to 4 Ezra, however it maintains a strong sense of divine sovereignty. [...]


[...] Apocalyptic rhetoric and its effect on religious identity Introduction Apocalypticism offers a unique rhetoric of violence. Israelite people experienced violence and domination for centuries under the control of Persians, Greeks, Selucids, Ptolemies, and Roman rulers. Israelite identity was challenged under these occupying forces because the God of Israel was a national God occupying a spatial existence in the Jerusalem Temple. The sovereignty of God and the holiness of the Temple must have been called to question when Jerusalem fell to the dominion of outside empires. [...]

Top sold for social sciences

Critically evaluating the ASPIRE model of social work

 Politics & international   |  Social sciences   |  Presentation   |  02/20/2009   |   .doc   |   7 pages

African Influence on Jazz

 Politics & international   |  Social sciences   |  Presentation   |  06/16/2008   |   .doc   |   3 pages

Recent documents in social sciences category

Death penalty: does the U.S. really need capital punishment?

 Politics & international   |  Social sciences   |  Term papers   |  09/12/2016   |   .doc   |   5 pages

Afghan women under the Taliban

 Politics & international   |  Social sciences   |  Term papers   |  09/09/2016   |   .doc   |   3 pages