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A study on jazz music

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marketing
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DePaul...

About the document

Alfonzo S.
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documents in English
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12 pages
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  1. Introduction
  2. The written musical score as a form of history
  3. The notion of Joe and Violet Trace
  4. Toni Morrison's novel Jazz
  5. Finding the self
  6. Audacious subjective inferences
  7. The process of historical restoration
  8. The language
  9. The moment of Joe and Violet's 'first conversation'
  10. Morrison models
  11. Violet's rejection of black women as a community problematic
  12. Morrison's work
  13. Eliminating the narrative artifice of objectivity
  14. The ensemble nature of jazz music
  15. The photograph of Dorcas
  16. The subjectivity of interpretation
  17. Joe's effect on Violet
  18. African-American novelists and writers
  19. Conclusion
  20. Sources

Music frequently requires more than one performer to be created. Perhaps two or more musicians are required, each playing a ?part? ? without the presence of all the musicians, the song would be incomplete. Perhaps one musician will accompany a singer, each performing distinct but interdependent roles. Human relationships of love and friendship easily can be seen in a similar light. It takes two, as they say. Also similar to this musical analogy is the act of creating and reading literature. For each performer, there must be an audience, if the work is to be realized.
Of course jazz could be used in this analogy. Jazz music has the same requirements for partnership and role-playing. However, jazz frequently builds upon the notion of improvisation. One or more of the performers must create the music as it is being played, and the other performers must react to those creations in real-time. Jazz then becomes a powerful analogy for relationships that exist in a rapidly changing environment. If circumstances change rapidly, the partners must improvise their roles. If one of the partners changes or is changed by something, the other partner must improvise in real-time ? or the relationship will be broken. The musicians may stop playing if they have lost the tune or if they cannot agree on where to take the improvised piece.

[...] She responds to Violet's complaint by predicting the story she will tell based on the common architecture of the blues song: Now I recon you going to tell me some old hateful story about how a young girl messed over you and how he's not to blame because he was just walking down the street minding his own business, when this little twat jumped on his back and dragged him off to her bed. Save your breath. You'll need it on your deathbed (14). [...]


[...] The politics of Jazz speak to the issues of the representation of black women's lives and make the novel worthy of its name while establishing a ?visceral relationship between writer and reader? (2094). In her interview with Tate, Morrison expresses her concern that ?relationships between women were always written about as though they were subordinate to some other roles they're playing? (Black Women Writers at Work118), continuing that the legitimacy of the relationships between black women and the function of such relationships in a socio-political context was overlooked, yet highly important to the black community. [...]


[...] Thinking of them, their relationship, and even the narration of events from the perspective of the jazz analogy I have just discussed, we can see their migration holds the potential for successful adaptation, a success modeled after the formation of jazz music itself. All of this can be seen in Toni Morrison's novel Jazz. Jazz music, as it functions in the novel, becomes a social tool of empowerment via improvisational creation and interpersonal connection, unifying the community and providing an outlet to express its social and political needs. [...]

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