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A study on the Native Americans

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journalism
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Valparaiso...

About the document

Rachel M.
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documents in English
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term papers
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3 pages
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General public
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  1. Introduction
  2. The strategies used by Indigenous peoples to gain identity
  3. The literal meaning of Wanagi wacipi
  4. The ghost dance
  5. Symbols of oppression
  6. The American Indian Movement (AIM)
  7. Alcatraz-Red Power Movement (ARPM)
  8. Indigenous activism
  9. The American Indian Religious Freedom Act
  10. Conclusion
  11. Works cited

Indigenous peoples have endured many hardships and damages inflicted on them over the years. They have dealt with attacks by foreign peoples, with forced removal from their own land and the development of reservations, with forced assimilation encouraged both by society and government policy, and with desecration of sacred lands and ancestral remains. In attempts to survive, overcome, and even prosper in the midst of these hardships, Indigenous peoples have pursued several cultural, legal, and economic strategies.

[...] In an attempt to call attention to continuing problems in Indigenous communities, hundreds of Native Americans marched from San Francisco, CA to Washington, DC. The march symbolized the historical forced removal of Indigenous populations from their homelands onto reservations. After 1978, Red Power activism came to a close, largely as a result of suppression through violence by the FBI. From 1972 to 1978, many AIM and ARPM members were imprisoned, assaulted, and killed. There were few arrests made and most of the cases were not investigated at all (PBS and KQED). [...]


[...] As successful as Indigenous activism and the Red Power movement was in the 1970s in acquiring Indian studies, cultural museums, and religious litigation, there are still many flaws in the interaction between the U.S. government and indigenous populations. Real protection of land, that of reservation land and sacred land, remains elusive. As significant as NAGPRA was in affecting how Indigenous populations are viewed, Native Americans still retain a dependent nation status. With no real self-governing power, Indigenous populations lack the resources necessary to make significant changes in their communities. Many Indigenous communities are overtaken with poverty and alcoholism, and the negative aspects that come with these conditions. [...]

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