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Articles of Confederation

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Jqder M.
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  1. Introduction
  2. Articles of Confederation
  3. Role of article II in keeping the central government weak from 1783 to 1787
  4. Term limits as outlined in article V
  5. Admission of Canada into the United States of America, Article XII
  6. Conclusion

Article II played the greatest part in keeping the central government weak from 1783 to 1787. The article required each state to retain its sovereignty, freedom, and independence, all the power, jurisdiction, and right, which were not delegated to the by this United States central government.

This article created very powerful state governments and therefore Americans, who identified with the state governments, specialized on building weak central government.5 The lack of a strong national government led to limitations in the central leadership, economic organization and legislative efficiency. Congress was economically limited because it could neither regulate trade with Native American tribes nor could it negotiate trade agreements with foreign countries.

Economically, congress could only regulate trade with Native American tribes as far as this did not tamper with the individual state's ability to regulate its trade. The central government further lacked the power to make trade negotiations and agreements with foreign countries. There was no trade regulation between states; states could impose taxes on trade between states. The central government could not regulate such activities though they were undermining interstate trade and relationships. The states had their own money and therefore did not require money printed by the central government.

[...] Thomas, John C. "The Term Limitations Movement in U.s. Cities." National Civic Review (1992). Print. Farabaugh, Daniel, Stephanie Muntone, and T R. Teti. Mcgraw-hill's Sat Subject Test: U.s. History. New York, N.Y: McGraw-Hill Internet resource. [...]


[...] Shows that the Articles of Confederation was created to make the central government on purpose Thomas, John C. "The Term Limitations Movement in U.s. Cities." National Civic Review (1992). Print. The article provides a current view of the term limitations movement ideas in the United States Secondary sources Farabaugh, Daniel, Stephanie Muntone, and T R. Teti. Mcgraw-hill's Sat Subject Test: U.s. History. New York, N.Y: McGraw-Hill Internet resource. The book provides the analysis of United States invitation of Canada to join the union. [...]


[...] The states had their own money and therefore did not require money printed by the central government. The central government lacked a central leadership because there was no central leader to conduct foreign affairs; it further lacked the ability to raise an army of itself to handle external threats that gave Britain an advantage. The central government therefore lacked a solid and strong overall leadership that could monitor national issues like war coordination and international relations. Further, the legislative efficiency of the central government was limited by article II. [...]


[...] Articles of Confederation The articles were created out of a desire to create a weak central government. The American people had come from the American Revolution, fighting a war to overthrow the King, who represented the central government. The articles were written by John Dickinson in 1777 and were designed weakly on purpose to make the states posses more powers than the central government.[1] The Articles of Confederation finally collapsed but were useful in laying foundation for the formation of constitution convention in 1787. [...]

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