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Civil rights movement in America

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Mickey D.
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  1. Civil rights movement
  2. African-Americans
  3. Martin nor Malcolm X

Despite the stop of slavery in the United States at the end of the 19th century, African Americans were still subjected to regular discrimination, were forced to use separate schools and public utilities from the better-quality ones of the whites, and they could not fully exercise their voting rights. By the 1950s, the blacks started to mobilize their fellow African Americans against discrimination. Civil rights groups came up and fought for equality in employment opportunities, voting rights, education, and housing. Civil rights activists engaged in various activities to challenge the draconian customs and laws to obtain equality for all Americans. The activists won some milestones; among them the 1954 Brown against Board of Education Supreme Court decision which declared unlawful and unconstitutional the states that demanded that white and black students attend different schools.

However, institutionalized and systemic racism continued to persist oppressing the African Americans. The environment, having given the African Americans the chance to see that where black and white citizens equal, attracted Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X to fight for the civil rights of black Americans. Malcolm X and Martin Luther King became significant persons in the struggle for freedom for the blacks (Waldschmidt-Nelson 142). Contrary to their image as adversaries, Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X should be properly understood as fellow justice fighters in the historical African American Civil Rights Movement, who were struggling against the same evil - racism - and for the same goal - freedom for African Americans.

[...] The early backgrounds of the two activists contributed to their different reactions to American racism. Malcolm X was raised in an environment of anger and fear due to the seeds of bitterness planted in him after his house was burnt down by the Klu Klux Klan, murder of his father, divergence of his family after her mother underwent a nervous breakdown. The circumstances led him to a life driven by the desire to revenge and full of hatred. Both activists finally emerged as icons of African-American culture and caused a great impact on black Americans. [...]


[...] "The Civil Rights Movement: Struggle And Resistance, (Studies In Contemporary History) Author: William T. Ma." (2010): 304. Waldschmidt-Nelson, Britta. Dreams and Nightmares: Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm and the Struggle for Black Equality in America. University Press of Florida, 2012. [...]


[...] The activists won some milestones; among them the 1954 Brown against Board of Education Supreme Court decision which declared unlawful and unconstitutional the states that demanded that white and black students attend different schools. However, institutionalized and systemic racism continued to persist oppressing the African Americans. The environment, having given the African Americans the chance to see that where black and white citizens equal, attracted Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X to fight for the civil rights of black Americans. Malcolm X and Martin Luther King became significant persons in the struggle for freedom for the blacks (Waldschmidt-Nelson 142). Contrary to their image as adversaries, Martin Luther King Jr. [...]


[...] Malcolm X and Martin helped fight the difference among the blacks, mount black power to enable them overcome the hatred that bounded them. Works Cited Cone, James H. Martin and Malcolm and America: A dream or a nightmare. Orbis Books Hall, Simon. Peace and freedom: The civil rights and antiwar movements in the 1960s. University of Pennsylvania Press Howard-Pitney, David. Martin Luther King Jr, Malcolm and the Civil Right Struggle of the 1950s and 1960s. Bedford/St. Martin's Riches, William T. Martin. [...]

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