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Collegiate publication censorship: Will Hazelwood infiltrate campus life?

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  1. Introduction.
    1. A considerable amount of freedom.
    2. Fear of the standards set forth in the Hazelwood case may infiltrate college campuses.
  2. Suggestions given by Cathy Kuhlmeier, former layout editor, and Spectrum staffers.
  3. The 1969 Tinker v. Des Moines decision.
  4. The mandatory acceptance of the Hazelwood conclusion.
  5. The case of Kincaid v. Gibson and Kentucky State University's disapproval of the cover's color.
  6. The case of Hosty v. Carter or Hosty v. Governors State University.
  7. Conclusion.

In the United States of America, over 295,516,700 citizens enjoy a considerable amount of freedom. A vast assortment of backgrounds, races, and occupations are compiled to make up the population of America. Although this diversity is combined to make a powerful country, it also brings internal conflict. All of the religions, ancestries, and different levels of financial stability make for a difficult audience for the media to please, especially if readers are better defined as students of schools that are financially supported by the government. The ongoing battle between the freedom to print material, regardless of restriction, and the freedom to place boundaries on the content of material, rages on. Censorship serves as a complicated concept, with many layers. The age of the target audience that the publication caters to has successfully acquired the right of appropriate censorship in the landmark case Hazelwood School District v. Kuhlmeier. Although this precedent was specifically fashioned for high school newspapers, some fear the standards set forth in the Hazelwood case may infiltrate college campuses.

[...] Until a case comes along that sets a precedent both appealing to the protection of journalists' First Amendment rights and overall contentment of readers, the ideas behind the Hazelwood case will remain as the measuring stick. Works Cited Cathy Cowan reflects on her high school journalism fight in Hazelwood case. First Amendment Feb . Calvert, Clay, and Don R. Pember. Mass Media Law. New York: McGraw Hill; 2005. College Hazelwood case continues. Student Press Law Center Feb . Course-based Webpages, Listserv, & Topclass. [...]


[...] Cathy Cowan reflects on her high school journalism fight in Hazelwood case. First Amendment Feb . Same as 1 Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District. Legal Information Institute Feb http://supct.law.cornell.edu/supct/search/display.html?terms=tinker&url=/sup ct/html/historics/USSC_CR_0393_0503_ZO.html. same as 4 Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District. Legal Information Institute Feb http://supct.law.cornell.edu/supct/search/display.html?terms=tinker&url=/sup ct/html/historics/USSC_CR_0393_0503_ZO.html. Calvert, Clay, and Don R. Pember. Mass Media Law. New York: McGraw Hill; 2005. Cathy Cowan reflects on her high school journalism fight in Hazelwood case. First Amendment Feb . [...]


[...] In association with Justices Thurgood Marshall and Harry Blackmun, Justice William Brennan's, dissenting opinion stated that young men and women of Hazelwood East expected a civics lesson, but not the one the Court teaches them today[13],? it can be inferred that the decision rendered was not necessarily the decision that was expected. Spectators of the trial could have expected the Supreme Court to journey farther into the concept of the 1969 Tinker v. Des Moines decision, which said can hardly be argued that either students or teachers shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate[14].? This opinion would have coincided with Justice Brennan, who said Court should have applied the ?Tinker' standard[15].? Aware of this line of thinking, Justice White explained the distinction between the two by saying Tinker ruling deals with the right of educators to silence a student's personal expression that happens on school property. [...]

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