Search icone
Search and publish your papers

How the American civil war medicine has influenced modern medicine

Or download with : a doc exchange

About the author

research
Level
Advanced
Study
accounting
School/University
westminster

About the document

Published date
Language
documents in English
Format
Word
Type
presentations
Pages
7 pages
Level
Advanced
Accessed
0 times
Validated by
Committee Oboolo.com
0 Comment
Rate this document
  1. Civil War and Medicine?An Overview
  2. Sanitation and the Spread of Disease
  3. Wounds from Battle
  4. Surgeries of the Civil War
  5. Conclusion

Over the course of the last century notable advancements have been made in the area of medical science. In addition to improving the technology available for use in medicine, professionals have come to realize the importance of basic hygiene as a means for infection control. As such, the quality of medical care has improved drastically in recent years. Interestingly, the progress that has been achieved in this area would not be possible without an historical understanding of the problems of medical care in the past. With the realization that understanding the history of medical care is important to understanding current practices in this field, there is a clear impetus to examine medical practices of the past such that a more integral understanding of historical discourse in the area can be understood. Using this as a basis for investigation this research considers what has been written about medical practices during the Civil War.

[...] ?Report from the Union Medical Director at the Battle of Shiloh.? [1862]. US Civil War. Accessed April at: . Rutkow, Ira. Bleeding Blue and Gray : Civil War Surgery and the Evolution of American Medicine. New York: Random House ?Sanitation in the Army of the Potomac.? [1861]. US Civil War. Accessed April at: . Stevenson, William G . ?Thirteen months in the rebel army.? In: Harold Elk Straubing (ed.) In Hospital and Camp: The Civil War Through the Eyes of Its Doctors and Nurses. [...]


[...] For this reason, it could be argued that the Civil War was a boon to the overall development of modern medicine. While it is clear that thousands of individuals had to die in order to make this modernization possible it is difficult to identify another situation that would have given physicians the opportunity to explore the human body and the process of disease development in the manner that occurred during the Civil War. Thus, even though the Civil War enacted a huge toll on the American population, medical science was able to significantly benefit from this process. [...]


[...] Bleeding Blue and Gray : Civil War Surgery and the Evolution of American Medicine, (New York: Random House, 2005): 4. [4]Ira Rutkow [5]Ira Rutkow [6]?Report from the Union Medical Director at the Battle of Shiloh.? [1862]. US Civil War. Accessed April at: . [7]?Report from the Union Medical Director at the Battle of Shiloh.? [1862]. [8]?Sanitation in the Army of the Potomac.? [1861]. US Civil War. Accessed April at: . [9]?Sanitation in the Army of the Potomac.? [1861]. [10]Jenny Goellnitz. [...]

Similar documents you may be interested in reading.

The melting pot revisited: Supporting research into the genetic diversity of the American population

 Social studies   |  Sociology   |  Term papers   |  03/05/2009   |   .doc   |   14 pages

Patrice Lumumba: American foreign policy and cover-ups

 Law & contracts   |  International   |  Term papers   |  04/16/2009   |   .doc   |   6 pages

Top sold for accounting

Strategic analysis of Mercedes Benz

 Business & market   |  Accounting   |  Presentation   |  02/15/2012   |   .doc   |   28 pages