Search icone
Search and publish your papers

Study of nursing management

Or download with : a doc exchange

About the author

 
Level
Advanced
Study
sociology
School/University
UCLA

About the document

Published date
Language
documents in English
Format
Word
Type
presentations
Pages
5 pages
Level
Advanced
Accessed
1 times
Validated by
Committee Oboolo.com
0 Comment
Rate this document
  1. Introduction
  2. Factors for nurse retention
  3. Thrall's article, 'Nurturing Your Nurse Managers'
    1. Five main retention factors for nurse managers
    2. Having a voice and feeling appreciated
  4. The article by Kinnerly McGuire
  5. Personal mastery of specific professional traits
  6. The article by Maria Shirey
  7. Conclusion
  8. Bibliography

Nursing management remains a critical component in today's healthcare. Due to a wide array of factors, the number of nurse managers is diminishing, and the healthcare industry is scrambling to stop this trend from continuing. Research and surveys have shown that the nurses are generally overworked and stressed because of the interminable nursing shortage that society has been facing for the past century. Researchers aim to discover why the shortage exists in the first place, and must tackle issues about gender stereotyping, financial rewards, as well as respect and recognition. The following articles will mention some of these ideas and reveal that many nurses lack the latter. These concerns also illustrate how effective nurse management can contribute to a better healthcare environment for the nursing staff as well as patient care.

[...] Some progress, as in the Atlanta hospital, has been made, but obviously, the commitment needs to be applied at a national level. It is time to start listening and giving back to the nursing sector, a group that has only selflessly given to others. Bibliography: Lynn, Wieck K. (2005). Nurse Manager Survival in an Age of New Health Care Priorities. Nevada RNformation, pages 1-3. Retrieved 9/23/2007, from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa4102/is_200505/ai_n13636411 McGuire, E., Kinnerly, S. (2006). Nurse managers as Transformational and Transactional leaders. Journal of Nursing Economics. Vol 24, (40 pg 179 Parsons, [...]


[...] According to the Nursing Leadership Institute Competency Model, nurse managers should seek personal mastery of specific professional traits. First, they need to be open to receiving feedback on both strengths and weaknesses. Additionally, they should demonstrate positive leadership skills in demanding situations and keep a professional demeanor. Nurse managers also serve as role models for other staff members and should assume responsibility for personal and career goal development. Managers should also be open to continual learning along with expanding their network of professional colleagues both within and without the organization. [...]

Similar documents you may be interested in reading.

A critical analysis of issues in nursing management

 Science & technology   |  Medical studies   |  Case study   |  04/13/2009   |   .doc   |   12 pages

A nursing management perspective of a critical incident report

 Science & technology   |  Medical studies   |  Term papers   |  04/15/2009   |   .doc   |   8 pages

Top sold for management

Merger and acquisition - Buffett's bid for Media General's newspapers

 Business & market   |  Management   |  Case study   |  12/21/2017   |   .doc   |   21 pages

Management decision making: The Nestle Nespresso case

 Business & market   |  Management   |  Case study   |  09/29/2010   |   .doc   |   6 pages