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The marketing strategy and business model of Heineken

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  1. Introduction
  2. Competitive pressures facing the international beer industry
    1. Critical factors for Heineken's success
    2. Competencies and competitive advantages of Heineken
    3. Current international strategy and recommendations

Heineken was founded in 1863 in Amsterdam by a man named Gerard A. Heineken. While the Dutch brewing business was in decline, Heineken purchased a brewery for an excellent price and, as a result of the high quality products he produced, eventually received international acclaim for the Heineken brand (www.heinekeninternational.com). Today, almost 140 years after initially starting the company, Heineken is still based in Amsterdam and continues to do exceedingly well as one of the most popular and well-recognized international beers. By constantly expanding into new markets, acquiring new breweries, and ensuring that the Heineken quality remains excellent, the company is able to continue to gain market share and expand into new countries.

[...] Works Cited ?Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc.: Form 10K.? Anheuser-Busch, March Accessed May Hawkins, Josh. ?Heineken Halts All TV Advertising.? FutureLab, October Accessed May History Page.? European Challenge Cup. Accessed May Fowlkes, Michael. ?Heineken - the next Starbucks?? BloggingStocks.com, March Accessed May ?Heineken Premium Light: Great Strategy, Poor Execution.? Ad Blabber, June 26th Accessed May ?Heineken USA - Marketing Strategy.? Bnet, January Accessed May ?Heineken streamlines.? BeverageDaily.com, October Accessed May ?Heineken to target younger market as part of new growth strategy.? Drinks Business Review, October Accessed May ?Heineken Holding N.V. [...]


[...] The entire bar is covered with signs, tools, and t-shirts and dedicated to Heineken. The TV will play Heineken ads, and there will be no way for a customer to enter the bar without feeling the presence of Heineken. This move has been a success in airports, and it allows Heineken to expose itself to millions of potential international customers annually. When asked whether or not Heineken will be able to duplicate this ?Starbucks? experience outside of the airport, one source was doubtful: think that it will probably see some success in the airports, but I don't think that they will be able to take that success and move it onto Main Street America? (bloggingstocks.com). [...]


[...] Many consumer advocates claim that both American and international companies are advertising to underage consumers using various psychological tactics, but the beer companies are claiming that their advertisements are perfectly acceptable, legitimate, and not targeted towards a younger audience (www.anheuser-busch.com). When expanding and attempting to increase their visibility, beer manufacturers tend to get involved in joint ventures, various investments, and other arrangements which are inherently risky. While some of these decisions are profitable, others fail and have adverse affects on the company's financial statements. Reliance on suppliers and wholesalers is another important element for beer manufacturers who do not fully operate their chain of operations. [...]


[...] The Marketing Strategy And Business Model of Heineken I. Introduction Heineken was founded in 1863 in Amsterdam by a man named Gerard A. Heineken. While the Dutch brewing business was in decline, Heineken purchased a brewery for an excellent price and, as a result of the high quality products he produced, eventually received international acclaim for the Heineken brand (www.heinekeninternational.com). Today, almost 140 years after initially starting the company, Heineken is still based in Amsterdam and continues to do exceedingly well as one of the most popular and well- recognized international beers. [...]


[...] These ventures are very expensive and come with risk. In order to reduce this risk, my focus would not be to expand, but to succeed in current more markets. While other beer manufacturers are trying to expand into new markets, Heineken should take customers away from right under their nose in areas that this company believes to be the most secure. One expensive but effective strategy would be to sign up a group of attractive females to wear Heineken clothing and to enter bars asking men to purchase Heineken beers. [...]

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