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Nature and the role of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in Ireland, China and India (2005)

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  1. FDI and development.
  2. India & FDI.
    1. FDI in India.
    2. Facts.
    3. Problems.
    4. Roadblocks.
  3. China & FDI.
    1. Competitive advantages.
    2. Measures taken by China.
    3. Nature of FDI.
    4. Major tax incentives.
  4. Ireland & FDI.
    1. Historical background of Ireland.
    2. Why choose Ireland?
    3. Nature of FDI.
    4. Resource transfer.
    5. Effects on unemployment.
    6. Balance of payments.
  5. Conclusion.

Through an efficient allocation of money because they are implemented. In countries where the education system and the facilities are well designed for LUCAS. DUNNING's OLI paradigm (ownership, location, internalization: The advantages of the firm become the country's ones. FDI can be considered a way to strengthen the ?domination of capitalist economies? and the dependence of peripheral countries for PREBISCH. The neomarxist theory is outdated but FDI can still have no effect, or even detrimental ones. Recent development of newly industrialized countries (Asian tigers and dragons) that implemented an updated version of AKAMATSU's development scheme (e.g. : CHINA). To the host country, efficient MNCs can act as an incentive for national companies (even more so concerning clusters).

[...] "Foreign Direct Investment in the World Economy" in Staff Studies for the World Economic Outlook, IMF Mallampally, Padma "The importance of foreign direct investment for exports, economic growth and poverty" in UNCTAD, Globalization and Liberalization: Effects of International Economic Relations on Poverty, UNCTAD, Geneva Globe Nature and role of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in Ireland, China and India (2005) Agenda Theoretical background of FDI Focusing on the countries studied: India China Ireland Conclusion FDI: theoretical background FDI and development FDI increases the host country's growth rate through an efficient allocation of money because they are implemented: In countries where the education system and the facilities are well designed for LUCAS DUNNING's OLI paradigm (ownership, location, internalization): the advantages of the firm become the country's ones They offer extra resources for the host country FDI/GDP ratio in developing countries : in 1988 in 2000 FDI and development FDI can be considered a way to strengthen the domination of capitalist economies and the dependence of peripheral countries for PREBISCH The neomarxist theory is outdated but FDI can still have no effect, or even detrimental ones The dependence on foreign companies (ex. [...]


[...] In 2005, the cumulative stock of FDI invested in Ireland stood at 125% of GDP, the highest in the OECD countries, bar Luxembourg Transfer of technology the technology base has been enhanced as a result of FDI by technology-based MNEs Transfer of management a Study on clustering in indigenous software sector found that 1/3 of entrepreneurs worked in foreign software firms immediately before the start-up of new firm and 2/3 had worked in one at some stage in their careers (NESC, 2002). [...]


[...] : CHINA) Japanese model FDI and development BLOMSTORM, GLOBERMAN, KOKKO: transfers to the host country, efficient MNCs can act as an incentive for national companies (even more so concerning clusters) Firms are more disposed to transfer technology when they own 100% of the local subsidiary Vertical links between companies whip up such transfers KRUGMAN, NEG: location of FDI FDI tend to be implemented in the same location (that gathers assets for MNCs) before generating positive spillovers for the whole region For the government, this means: Setting up incentives to attract FDI (e.g fiscal policies) Prompting companies to settle in the best location for the country Avoiding imbalances in the country's spatial organization and gaps between national and international companies FDI and development MAINGUY (2004), Different policies for different types of FDI and countries: Some countries will be chosen for their characteristics (growth, facilities, political stability, their educated workforce will allow them to benefit from FDI Some countries attract FDI only because of their tax policy, their exports do not benefit local companies but only foreign international ones; they have to ease transfers between both kinds of companies FDI and development Some countries are chosen because they can provide a low cost workforce; they have to set up policies in order to allow them to upgrade gradually their specialization Countries that attract mines- or petrol-linked capital are in a stalemate because the FDI will not prompt them to enhance their situation The poorest countries have been left alone so far and will remain dependent on international solidarity for the foreseeable future FDI and development To sum up: FDI is a growth lever for host countries But they can have detrimental effects on the country's structure and economy Looking at the channels that link FDI and growth (education, transfers, location), we can advise the country as to which policies to implement in order to attract FDI Turning growth into development will highly depend on the nature of both the country and FDI itself India & FDI FDI in INDIA After independence: aversion to FDI linked to the colonial past (UK colony) The Indian economy had been ruled by a foreign company for decades: the East Indian Company. [...]

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