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History and historiography of the English agricultural revolution

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  1. A family that is closely linked with the US authorities
    1. A strong commitment to the American political and economic life
    2. The incarnation of the "model family" in the American myth of the Kennedys
  2. A controversial ?clan?
    1. The hidden faces of the Kennedy clan
    2. The end of a myth?

When one thinks of the agricultural revolution, the first images that may come to mind are the introduction of new crops to improve soil fertility, improved tillage techniques, improved animal breeds, or the abandonment of fallow. These various innovations have been observed, unevenly across regions since their advent. The beginning of the agricultural revolution was controversial for many historians. Its definition is debated. Traditionally, the agricultural revolution is defined as a set of transformations that affected European agriculture in modern times. A more precise definition is given by Marc Bloch; according to him, it represents "great upheavals of the technical and agricultural uses, which, throughout Europe, dates vary by country, marked the advent practices of operating today." Its primary effect was to increase the productivity of the crop and livestock production and thus increase considerably the production of foodstuffs and agricultural raw materials. The country that has played the role of "pilot" is England, and is the subject of our analysis. In this context, we will ask how the agricultural revolution was characterized in England, the factors that have motivated these rapid changes and whether it really had an agricultural revolution. After examining the motives and human implications, we examine the practices and the result and in the last part, we reflect on the historiographical debate surrounding the agricultural revolution.

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