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Essay on “Letter from Birmingham Jail”

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  1. Introduction
  2. Moral law and the law of God
  3. The impact of unjust law
  4. Interpretation of unjust law by the King
  5. The King's description of a just law
  6. Conclusion

In ?Letter from Birmingham Jail? Dr. Martin Luther King, raises an interesting point about the civil right's movement. He notes those who rallied for the government to enforce the landmark decision of 1954, in which the Supreme Court ordered the desegregation of the school system, were often found to be in violation of other laws. Dr. King explains that while the behavior of civil rights activists may seem contradictory, the activists were actually obeying moral law, though they were often jailed for disobeying the laws of the land. It is through this example that King explains the concept of just and unjust laws (King 361). This same concept can also be applied to the female characters in ?Trifles? by Susan Glaspell and ?Antigone? by Sophocles. While the women characters in ?Trifles? and ?Antigone? are guilty of breaking the law, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. would probably agree that the laws that they have disobeyed are unjust laws and that the women are indeed abiding by just, moral law.

[...] Essay on ?Letter from Birmingham Jail? In ?Letter from Birmingham Jail? Dr. Martin Luther King, raises an interesting point about the civil right's movement. He notes those who rallied for the government to enforce the landmark decision of 1954, in which the Supreme Court ordered the desegregation of the school system, were often found to be in violation of other laws. Dr. King explains that while the behavior of civil rights activists may seem contradictory, the activists were actually obeying moral law, though they were often jailed for disobeying the laws of the land. [...]


[...] While the women gather the items, the county officials are collecting evidence from the house and attempting to figure out whether the woman has actually killed her husband. When the men are outside, the two women find evidence that suggests that Mrs. Wright was apparently very nervous before she left the home. Last, the women find a canary that appeared to have been killed in the same way that her husband was killed (Glaspell 831). After discussing how lonely and unsettling Mrs. [...]

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