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Punishment Vs. Rehabilitation in the Juvenile Justice System

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  1. Introduction
  2. The focus
  3. Community services
  4. The system
  5. Probation
  6. Incarceration
  7. Those opposed
  8. Conclusion

Rehabilitative intervention will indeed impact community services programs. The state and community programs will need to further extend their reach to those minors who are at risk of becoming criminal offenders. To be at risk means a minor has attributes of mental, emotional or social developments that may heighten their potential to offend. This can include anything from abuse or neglect in the home, their surroundings, their siblings, their grades in school, or their susceptibility to peer pressure. Programs such as the Child and Family Services will need to provide extensive and through house checks where claims of abuse and neglect have been made. School teachers are mandated reporters. If signs of abuse or neglect are shown, they must report these concerns to authorities.

The juvenile justice system focuses on those under the age of 18. Though, ?today, in almost every state, youths who are 13 or 14 years of age (or less) can be tried and punished as adults for a broad range of offenses, including nonviolent crimes.? (Piquero & Steinberg, n.d.) Judges presiding over juvenile court cases have many options to sift through. The judge must take into consideration not only the seriousness of the offence, the minor's age, but also their maturity level. There is a very important reason that the adult courts and juvenile courts are kept separate, juveniles lack the capacity to make decisions. It is very possible for a minor to recognize what is right from what is wrong, but most juveniles act on a whim; they do not think before they act. Juveniles are risk-takers, prone to irrational emotional changes, and carry an inconsistency when it comes to make responsible decisions. Moreover, there are some instances where the minor commits the same offences that he or she had been victimized by.

[...] The charges were later dropped, and she was referred to a community-based diversion program, Alternatives Inc., where she was counseled to build her self-esteem and performed community service.? (Owens-Schiele, 2010) Our emphasis should be placed on saving the juveniles, rather than punishing them. day, treatment of young people who run afoul of the law may be guided by logic rather than politics, prejudice, and uninformed passion.? (Cose, 2010) This day should be today. Resources Used: Cose, Ellis. (2010). Children Are Not Too Old to Change. Retrieved on August from: http://www.newsweek.com/2010/01/14/children-are-not-too-old-to- change.html. CRC Health Group. (2010). Teen Boot Camps - Are They Effective? Retrieved on August from: http://www.boot-camps-info.com/effective.html Hassakis, Mark D. (2010). ISBA President Will Work on Juvenile Justice Reform. [...]


[...] Those Opposed One form of sentencing will not work for all juveniles who have entered the system. This is a fact that cannot be disputed. However, unless juveniles are given the opportunity to prove themselves how else would the system be able to recognize rehabilitation is possible. Juveniles are not too old to alter bad behavior. last thing we want to happen is increased exposure of our youth to hardened criminals as their role models.? (Hassakis, 2010) Incorporating the use of rehabilitation will provide a juvenile the opportunity to be re-taught. [...]


[...] Community Services Rehabilitative intervention will indeed impact community services programs. The state and community programs will need to further extend their reach to those minors who are at risk of becoming criminal offenders. To be at risk means a minor has attributes of mental, emotional or social developments that may heighten their potential to offend. This can include anything from abuse or neglect in the home, their surroundings, their siblings, their grades in school, or their susceptibility to peer pressure. [...]

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