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Where Prosecutions Go erroneous - Crime and Punishment

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General public
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criminal law
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USIU

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documents in English
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case study
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3 pages
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  1. Introduction
  2. Crime and Punishment
  3. The justice system
  4. Gilligan
  5. Conclusion

The main mandate of the justice system is to investigate, make arrests, gather evidence, bring charges forward, conduct trials, render a sentence and carry out a punishment. The judicial system is therefore trusted to make the right judgments and to give punishments only to those who deserve it in proportion to the nature of the crimes they have committed. They are not expected to make mistakes because they are supposed to conduct a sufficient investigation and gather enough evidence before they can convict a criminal (Gilligan 47). It is a pity however how many people are serving sentences for crimes they have never committed. Innocent people are languishing in jails in many parts of the world just because somebody failed to do their duty properly.

The death penalty information Centre estimates that about 1200 people executed since 1976 in the United States may have been innocent. A good example is the case of Willingham Cameron who was charged with the murder of his three children by arson. After his execution, a new report from a national arson expert concluded that the original investigation to the case was dangerously flawed and possibly will not hold up a finding of arson. The question is how many people cannot defend themselves or prove their innocence yet they really are innocent? (Garrett 69)

[...] Some of the judges and the officers no longer have their countries best interest at their hearts but are working hard for their own benefits and personal interests. Our justice system is quickly turning out to be the place where a lot of injustices actually occur. The craving for power has also been a common phenomenon affecting our justice system. Judges no longer make objective judgments but make their decisions and judgments according to the political wave in order to find favor with the high and mighty. [...]


[...] Where Prosecutions Go erroneous - Crime and Punishment The main mandate of the justice system is to investigate, make arrests, gather evidence, bring charges forward, conduct trials, render a sentence and carry out a punishment. The judicial system is therefore trusted to make the right judgments and to give punishments only to those who deserve it in proportion to the nature of the crimes they have committed. They are not expected to make mistakes because they are supposed to conduct a sufficient investigation and gather enough evidence before they can convict a criminal (Gilligan 47). [...]


[...] Those who are already in it should be counseled and helped overcome their feelings of shame and learn to regard themselves worthy for them to be better citizens. This will help reduce crime levels since the criminals will come out of prisons better people than they came in. in a nut shell, he advocated that prisons should be correctional facilities and not punishment facilities. In my view it is very necessary for criminals to be punished. Punishment is not a new word to young children and students. [...]

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