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The amendment 8: is death penalty a cruel and unusual punishment?

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  1. The vision and critters of the Supreme Court
  2. The evolution of the standards of decency

Amendment 8 of the United States Constitution is a part of the United States Bill of Rights, influenced by the English Bill of Rights of 1689. It was added to the constitution in 1791, and states that "Excessive bail shall not be required, not excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted". Why do the United States still impose death penalty whereas the majority of the greats democracies in the world prohibit it? Are Eighth Amendment and Death Penalty in contradiction? The Orders of the Supreme Court and the evolution of the standards of decency are delimiting the application of the capital fine. In 1997, the American Bar Association called for a suspension of the death penalty until changes were made to make certain that "death penalty cases are administered fairly and impartially, in accordance with due process and minimize the risk that innocent persons may be executed". Things can still change if laws as well as mentalities change.

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