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The rise of the Ku Klux Klan in North Carolina

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  1. Introduction.
  2. Background in which the Ku Klux Klan emerged and the reasons of this birth.
  3. The question of its identity.
  4. The way in which it acted and the response.
  5. Conclusion.
  6. Notes.
  7. Bibliography.

The original idea of the Ku Klux Klan was born in the late 1865, in the minds of six young men -John Lester, James Crowe, John Kennedy, Richard Reed, Frank Mc Cord and Calvin Jones- in the quiet town of Pulaski, Tennessee. They were Confederate soldiers during the Civil War and were bored with their dull lives. So they decided to form a club that they named after the Greek term "kyklos" meaning circle of friends. But their rather innocent organization showed an incredibly fast growth and rise in popularity, so much that it turns into a craze murdering thousands of people, mainly Black. It is though difficult to put the blame of all the Klan's activities on six people, that is why we should study in what political and geographical (with the narrowed scope of the state of North Carolina) contexts it fits in.

[...] Notes Roots of Wrath: Political Culture and the Origins of the First Ku Klux Klan in North Carolina to 1875, Rene Hayden (2003) The Invisible Empire, The Ku Klux Klan Impact on History, William Loren Katz (1986), page 9 Roots of Wrath: Political Culture and the Origins of the First Ku Klux Klan in North Carolina to 1875, Rene Hayden (2003) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ku_Klux_Klan Roots of Wrath: Political Culture and the Origins of the First Ku Klux Klan in North Carolina to 1875, Rene Hayden (2003), page 203 The Invisible Empire, The Ku Klux Klan Impact on History, William Loren Katz (1986), page 26 The role of the United States Army in North Carolina Civil disturbances 1865-1872, Donald Wayne Harritan (Greenville, N. [...]


[...] Indeed, the argument of White Supremacy alone not being sufficient, the Ku Klux Klan built a whole propaganda appealing to the people of that time period and their problems. Their ability to touch thousands of people guaranteed them a success in recruiting. For example, they attracted Protestants by telling them that they were always discriminated against and still prosecuted. They also frightened the people with the Black "invasion" in the society (no loyal slave anymore because they fled) and the rise of the modern woman (indeed, more and more women had to take active roles because their husbands had died during the Civil War). [...]


[...] One of the most famous action of the KKK in North Carolina at this time was their ride to Aaron Biggerstaff Biggerstaff was an ardent unionist. He had once tracked a member of the Klan, but he was arrested by the police because he fired and nearly killed one of this Klansman's relative. On April 8th 1871, Biggerstaff home was raided by forty Klansmen. His daughter and him were abused that night. And when he went to testify against them, he was threatened and beaten on his way. [...]

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