Search icone
Search and publish your papers

Canterbury Tales, The Wife of Bath Tale - Geoffrey Chaucer, 14th century - The hypocrisy of men in society

Or download with : a doc exchange

About the author

author
Level
General public
Study
educational...
School/University
CSW COLLEGE

About the document

Published date
Language
documents in English
Format
Word
Type
book reviews
Pages
4 pages
Level
General public
Accessed
0 times
Validated by
Committee Oboolo.com
0 Comment
Rate this document
  1. Multiple marriages
  2. Men's hypocrisy
  3. The lack of freedom for women, the cause of men's problems

In Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, "The Wife of Bath" is powerful and beautifully expressed work. In the tale, the Wife of Bath describes her five marriages while criticizing the hypocrisy and irrationality of men. She forces us to realize that men subdue their women and leave them little room to breathe, while complaining constantly about the nature of women and their inherent wickedness. Chaucer looks at marriage and relationships in the Middle Ages from a woman's point of view - a perspective very rarely addressed according to the Wife of Bath. As she provides us with examples of men behaving in ridiculous and inconsiderate ways, she conveys to us the hypocrisy of the system to which women are slaves.

[...] Here, the Wife of Bath is proving to us that men give no freedom to women and that this is the cause of all their problems. If women were given the power to make decisions, thing would run smoothly and men would have nothing to complain about. The system that men have built, however, makes this impossible, and instead of being on the same platform as women and creating a marriage of equals (or even a marriage in which a woman is in charge), men create a system that hurts women, provides them with no security, and forces them to act with malice towards their husbands. [...]


[...] The Wife of Bath is telling us that this is the answer to all problems relating to women. Once man overcomes his hypocrisy and stops viewing women in such a terrible light, he will be more able to provide them with that which they seek most, their sovereignty. Once this sovereignty is granted, the hypocritical system created by man will fall and it will be replaced by a better, more women-oriented system that will provide happiness to both genders. Chaucer's Wife Bath? tale provides us with an analysis of a male- dominated society in which women are viewed as wicked, unchaste sinners. [...]


[...] Using Jesus as an example, The Wife of Bath states that Jesus does not except each Christian to live up to perfection, without enjoying the pleasures of marriage. She states, [Jesus] spoke to those who would live perfectly,/And by your leave, lords, that is not for me /The flower of my best years I find it suits/To spend on the acts of marriage and its fruits? (Chaucer 116-120). In other words, there is really nothing wrong with marriage, even multiple marriages, and there is nothing in the bible which states otherwise. [...]


[...] In the tale, a The Wife of Bath describes her five marriages while criticizing the hypocrisy and irrationality of men. She forces us to realize that men subdue their women and leave them little room to breathe, while complaining constantly about the nature of women and their inherent wickedness. Chaucer looks at marriage and relationships in the Middle Ages from a woman's point of view?a perspective very rarely addressed according to the Wife of Bath. As she provides us with examples of men behaving in ridiculous and inconsiderate ways, she conveys to us the hypocrisy of the system to which women are slaves. [...]

Similar documents you may be interested in reading.

Humour in Geoffrey Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales"

 Philosophy & literature   |  Literature   |  Book review   |  09/29/2010   |   .doc   |   5 pages

Top sold for literature

Rise to Globalism: American Foreign Policy Since 1938

 Philosophy & literature   |  Literature   |  Book review   |  07/08/2013   |   .pdf   |   2 pages

Comedy in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales: 'Moral' Pilgrims and the Stories They Tell

 Philosophy & literature   |  Literature   |  Presentation   |  05/22/2008   |   .doc   |   6 pages