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Hemingway Explained

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  1. Introduction
  2. The Older Waiter and the Old Customer
  3. The Young Waiter
  4. Conclusion

A Clean, Well-lighted Place is part of the short stories written by Hemingway. The story is about three men who are in their stages of their lives; one young waiter, one old waiter and a customer who is old. The old man, customer, is living in a state of despair and has attempted to commit suicide severally. The younger waiter is not concerned about the old man's problem and wants him to leave (177).

The youthful man sees himself sufficient since he is in his state of youth, has a job, has confidence and is married. He fails to realize that not everyone has that for the reason that he is blinded by all his possessions. The old waiter on the other hand shows sympathy to the old man and understands his loneliness. He has an inner feeling of how one feels when they have no place to go home. Unlike the old waiter, the youthful waiter does not realize that other people live life trying to search for a meaning to live for another day without success.

[...] Hemingway Explained Introduction A Clean, Well-lighted Place is part of the short stories written by Hemingway. The story is about three men who are in their stages of their lives; one young waiter, one old waiter and a customer who is old. The old man, customer, is living in a state of despair and has attempted to commit suicide severally. The younger waiter is not concerned about the old man's problem and wants him to leave (177). The youthful man sees himself sufficient since he is in his state of youth, has a job, has confidence and is married. [...]


[...] The Young Waiter This man cannot see beyond himself. He proves to be brash and insensitive. He at some point admits that he is not in a state of loneliness like the two old men and is always eager to get home in the evening for he has a wife to get home to (177). He does not show any sympathy for others hence does not recognize that the café is home and refuge to other people who were once in his stage of life. [...]

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