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The Ideal of Immaculate Morality in Aristotle, Kant and Mill

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  1. Introduction
  2. Aristotelian Virtue
  3. Kantian Theory
  4. Mill & Utilitarianism
  5. Analysis of the Three Ideals
  6. Conclusion

Aristotle, Kant and Mill each developed ethical doctrines to dictate what constitutes an act and, ultimately, person of moral worth. From these doctrines, we can infer what a being of immaculate morality theoretically possesses in character. This being is a fabricated incarnation of what each philosopher would deem to have immaculate morality, one who consistently adheres to their prescribed ethical doctrines. Each philosopher belongs to a different school of ethical practice, Aristotle rooted in Aristotelian ethics, Kant rooted in Deontological Ethics and Mill in Utilitarianism. Therefore, each ideal differs greatly in characteristics.

We can develop an understanding of a universal ideal of immaculate morality by analyzing and comparing these three ideals. As opposed to adhering to individual ethical doctrines, the Universal Ideal of Immaculate Morality incorporates moral ideas from a variety of sources, from religious ideals to historical texts. Similarities between the ethical ideals are drawn to construct this universal ideal. Aristotle, Kant and Mill are among the ethicists essential to the fabrication of such a doctrine.

[...] http://www.wga.hu/framese.html?/html/g/giotto/padova/decorati/7vices/ index.html Long, D. Stephen. Christian Ethics: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press Print. Mill, John Stuart. Utilitarianism. London: Parker, Son and Bourne Chapter 2. Print. Tzu, Sun. The Art of War. [...]


[...] The Ideal of Immaculate Morality in Aristotle, Kant and Mill 1. Introduction Aristotle, Kant and Mill each developed ethical doctrines to dictate what constitutes an act and, ultimately, person of moral worth. From these doctrines, we can infer what a being of immaculate morality theoretically possesses in character. This being is a fabricated incarnation of what each philosopher would deem to have immaculate morality, one who consistently adheres to their prescribed ethical doctrines. Each philosopher belongs to a different school of ethical practice, Aristotle rooted in Aristotelian ethics, Kant rooted in Deontological Ethics and Mill in Utilitarianism. [...]


[...] Additionally, Aristotle does not assume that all humans are of equal rationality. It is imperative that this ideal holds to the highest good in all aspects of human life and the way we perceive and treat others is fundamental to this. Therefore, Aristotle's ideal of immaculate morality consists of a person of temperance, harmony, courage and the understanding of rationality. Theoretically, this person would act within the bounds of what would constitute the virtues Aristotle fails to mention and would by default possess these virtues simply by the nature of their actions. [...]


[...] The one major problem with this is that it is difficult to categorize this person, as every person's duties differ. His ideal person would always have to act out of duty, but since the course of actions each person takes can be different but of equal morality, his ideal could be a number of people which makes it difficult to narrow down to a specific set of character attributes, unlike Aristotle who sets out specific virtues that makes one ethical. [...]


[...] To understand the limits of the Universal Ideal of Immaculate Morality, we must consider all ethical doctrines relevant to its fabrication. We must examine all of the positive aspects of virtue ethics, deontological ethics, utilitarianism, and perhaps, to better inform this ideal, the great religious faculties of human existence since religious doctrines, such as Abrahamic religions, along with Buddhism and Taoism among others, and even including foundational historical texts pertinent to the topic, provide ethical doctrines to follow. In Sun Tzu's Art of War, he states, ?Qualities of wisdom, sincerity, humanity, courage and strictness [are] the five virtues of the general. [...]

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