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Poem analysis: A Mate Can Do No Wrong by Henry Lawson

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  1. Introduction
  2. Paraphrase
  3. Speaker
  4. Setting
  5. Diction
  6. Cultural bound
  7. Conclusion

The friendship was learnt in their way of working. They learnt to believe each other in their togetherness. They had been to many places like Hungerford, Bourke and Billabong together. They give their whole belief to their friends. So, no matter what their friends said, they would believe it. Whatever their mate want them to do, they would do it without any hesitation. Even though their friends were doing something wrong, they would think it as the most right one because no matter what a mate may do, a mate can do no wrong. Their belief toward each other was built in a very long journey of togetherness. They have experienced the bitterness and the sweetness of life together.

Even when they were jailed in a gaol, they still shared their belief. Even though they were jailed, by being together, still they were able to find a happiness and kept each other happy. They would believe in each other no matter what other people said about their friends. Even though people say that their friends were bad, they would not believe other people. They would never say any bad things about their own friends even when their friends were away or even already dead. They would still fight for their friends.

[...] - storm and shine: the bitterness and the sweetness of life. - The Throne of Life: The pain in life. - Song : song symbolizes happiness Imagery The imagery in this poem is sight. - the harbour-side And on the billabong?; this is visual imagery because by reading this part, the reader will imagine or visualize the condition of the harbour-side and also Billabong. This part appeal to the reader's sense of sight. - king-like, shares in storm and shine?. [...]


[...] In the past time, when the white people settled the Australian, people there needed more people to work. It was in the gold rush era when the wealthy people compete for the gold. So they brought a lot of worker to Australia. Even up to today, the mateship in Australia is still very good. It is said that Australian people are friendly and humorous. Bibliography Cannon, Michael and Viking O'neal Viking Who's Master? Who's Man.1971 p219. Horne, Donald. The Lucky Country Revisited. Dent 1987, p29. [...]


[...] - Bourke: According to www.wikipedia.com, Bourke is a modern town in the New South Wales Australia. - Billabong: Billabong is a dead river/ in where the water is stagnant. But the word ?Billabong' is typical to Australia. It is from Aborigin language. Australia is very famous for the billabong in where the crocodiles live in. - Harbor-side: Harbor side is a place where people can see the activity of the harbour Diction There are some dictions that are powerful in giving the meaning. [...]

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