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Comparing male antagonists in Francis Ford Coppola's film Bram Stoker's Dracula and Anonymous' short story The Mysterious Stranger

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  1. The male antagonists: Dracula and Azzo von Klatka
  2. The young female protagonists: Mina and Franziska

Anonymously written and translated from German into English, then published in 1860, "The Mysterious Stranger" is a tale which can irrefutably be compared to Bram Stoker's Dracula, published in 1897. It is unknown if Stoker was inspired by this anonymous author, but readers of vampire tales conclude that the two stories have uncanny similarities; such as a male warrior antagonist yearning for the blood and love of the young, beautiful female protagonist. Both tales have an impossible night-time journey in April, through the Carpathian Mountains to large, strange castles with packs of wolves howling in the distance. Francis Ford Coppola's film Bram Stoker's Dracula, released in 1992, makes these parallels even more apparent when seen on the big screen. A consistent theme of these works is male antagonists, in which the sub-theme of their desires collectively aids in each story's conclusion. Both vampires lust for each of these tempting women, acting as though there is nothing to stop them from attaining their desire of love. However, at the end of each story, each incumbent spirit is eternally destroyed.

[...] It is not made clear whether Dracula is buying property in London to be close to Mina because he believes she Elisabeta incarnated anew, but it is inferred from Renfield's insanity that the plan was already put in place to get Mina back when he visited. Dracula keeps Harker at his castle for a month, planning to get his lover back, while taunting Jonathan. Once they get to London, Dracula almost instantly begins to entice Mina, while in his charming young form which he is able to transform into. In Mysterious Stranger?, Azzo Klatka shows Franziska and her crew around his castle and he is entrapped by her beauty. [...]


[...] This is also shown in the film when Dracula does not eat food. At this point Franziska says, thin, dried up, whimsical stranger is far more interesting to me than the rosy-cheeked, well-dressed, polite, and prosy cousin? to whom she is engaged. In vampire stories, once the women become interested in the vampire they lose interest in their current partner and there is no turning back, as we see in both of these stories. Once Azzo knew he had successfully seduced Franziska, he came back in the night while she was asleep and left a streak on her throat?, indicating he had bitten her. [...]


[...] Comparing ?male antagonists? in Francis Ford Coppola's film Bram Stoker's Dracula and Anonymous' short story Mysterious Stranger? Anonymously written and translated from German into English, then published in 1860, Mysterious Stranger? is a tale which can irrefutably be compared to Bram Stoker's Dracula, published in 1897. It is unknown if Stoker was inspired by this anonymous author, but readers of vampire tales conclude that the two stories have uncanny similarities; such as a male warrior antagonist yearning for the blood and love of the young, beautiful female protagonist. [...]

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