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The Fall of Greece, The Rise of Rome

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  1. Introduction
  2. Athens and Sparta
  3. The advantages Rome had
  4. Rome's demands on the defeated
  5. The Roman republic and the conflicts within
  6. The Pax Romana and Religion
  7. Conclusion
  8. Works cited

Greece: City-States in Conflict

The Peloponnesian War was waged mostly between Sparta and Athens, although both had outside allies. After Sparta defeated Athens, the balance of power should have shifted to leave Sparta in the role of empire-builder, but the Spartans were unable to unify the Greek city-states. This failure can be attributed to a number of reasons.

key words- Thebians, Rome: Opportunity for Empire, Roman rule, The End of Rome, Lucius Cornelius Sulla .

[...] Rome: Opportunity for Empire After the Greeks failed to unify the city-states, Rome used its own methods to take control of the entire Mediterranean. Even beyond the coastal towns, Rome stretched its empire to include parts of Africa and Britain. Why did Rome succeed where the Greeks had failed? One of the advantages Rome had was the strength of its army. Although political and societal infighting was commonplace, Rome was able to uphold unified front against their enemies abroad? (Kishlansky 112, 5). [...]


[...] As Rome went farther afield to expand its territory, it also had the bonus of a large base of support at home. The text says this was due to the patrician system and the strong ties of familial and social loyalty felt in the Roman culture (118, 1). More support came from the Roman colonies and allies. When Hannibal marched against Rome, he was unable to keep his victories for long; the Roman colonies worked against him. Another factor in Rome's eventual victory was its flexibility in its fighting methods. [...]

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