Search icone
Search and publish your papers

The Trees: Jupiter and Mercury Destroy the City of Phrygia

Or download with : a doc exchange

About the author

Psychiatric Hospital
Level
General public
Study
psychology
School/University
Saint...

About the document

Published date
Language
documents in English
Format
Word
Type
presentations
Pages
5 pages
Level
General public
Accessed
0 times
Validated by
Committee Oboolo.com
0 Comment
Rate this document
  1. Introduction
  2. Turning the town to ashes
  3. Baucis and Philemon
  4. Welcoming the guests
  5. Conclusion
  6. Works cited

Rife with evil, the town needed to be destroyed. Piety had built Phrygia, but gluttony, unfaithfulness, and greed had razed the now repugnant country. Disgusted by the drinking orgies, sexual perversions, and absence of worship, Jupiter and Mercury watched from the Heavens. Phrygia's time had come. Jupiter set out to destroy the city and all its people immediately, but Mercury, his son, held him back.

[...] Meanwhile, Baucis, hustling and bustling in the background, raked the coals from the ashes, kindled a fire, and fed it with the sheets from her and her husband's bed. It was full of holes. Jupiter stared agape at the hospitality and piety of Baucis and Philemon in the face of their poverty. Deception. It was all deception. Baucis and Philemon caught a glimpse of Jupiter and Mercury climbing the hill. Immediately, they assumed these two gentleman had money by their lavish garments, money that they desperately wanted. [...]


[...] As it was the easiest way, Jupiter prepared to grant Baucis and Philemon immortality. However, the trees by the couple's humble home caught Jupiter's attention. He remembered how endearing he found the trees to be, when they appeared interwoven together as if eternally in love. Inspired by this vision, Jupiter to make that image their fate. Suddenly, Baucis saw Philemon's hands transform into branches and leaves, and Philemon watched Baucis change similarly. Leafy crowns grew over their heads. They ran as quickly as they could away from this mysterious place where they had been transformed. [...]

Top sold for literature

Rise to Globalism: American Foreign Policy Since 1938

 Philosophy & literature   |  Literature   |  Book review   |  07/08/2013   |   .pdf   |   2 pages

Freudian Psychology and Euripides's The Bacchae

 Philosophy & literature   |  Literature   |  School essay   |  12/17/2007   |   .doc   |   3 pages

Recent documents in literature category

Claude Cahun : l'exotisme intérieur - LEPERLIER François

 Philosophy & literature   |  Literature   |  Book review   |  08/06/2018   |   .doc   |   4 pages

Under the ribs of death - John Marilyn

 Philosophy & literature   |  Literature   |  Book review   |  08/06/2018   |   .doc   |   5 pages