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Fathering the Son

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  1. Introduction
  2. The formula to the way in which Plato sets the scene of Symposium
  3. The first speech
  4. The most famous of all the speeches in Symposium
  5. The heartfelt admissions of Alcibiades
  6. Conclusion
  7. Work cited

There is a lot to be said about love. It saturates literature, Hollywood, every means of creative output known to the history of this planet. There is something mysterious about it, something undiscovered. So desperate have populations been to answer the timeless questions of love that it can bring a group of men to a single meeting place to discuss the darkest regions of the heart and psyche. Plato's Symposium has been hailed as one of the greatest discourses on love ever written. The language, the imagery, it contains quotes and stories that are so embedded in modern thought that they could never be separated again. The dialogue basically serves as a competition between philosophy and poetry; the premise is that the former is correctly educated in the ways of love while the latter is misguided. Symposium is not just an exploration of love; it is an exploration of what it means to be human. The speeches delivered in the honor of Eros go beyond mere contrast. They are used to chronicle one man's flawed desire for immortality.

[...] Fathering the Son There is a lot to be said about love. It saturates literature, Hollywood, every means of creative output known to the history of this planet. There is something mysterious about it, something undiscovered. So desperate have populations been to answer the timeless questions of love that it can bring a group of men to a single meeting place to discuss the darkest regions of the heart and psyche. Plato's Symposium has been hailed as one of the greatest discourses on love ever written. [...]


[...] He is ashamed that he fell in love, because his body is nearly tearing apart from the pain of rejection. And this pain serves as the true contrast between Socrates and the rest of humanity. While Socrates escapes these feelings, claims them too below his goals, too earthy, to mortal for his immortality, Alcibiades drowns in them. Willingly, he returns to the feet of Socrates, to once again beg for him, beg for his love, beg for his sex. He is not a military hero in Symposium; he is a weak excuse for a living being. [...]

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