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Football, Mead-Halls, and Bards: Perpetuated Gender Roles from Anglo-Saxon Literature

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  1. Introdution
  2. The Wife's Lament
  3. The introduction to the story
  4. The idea that women are to serve men's needs
  5. The role of men in The Wanderer
  6. Conclusion

In modern times, men and women in America are divided by their stereotypical gender roles. Women are inferior to men; they are interested in domestic issues and should make the men in their lives happy. Men are chauvinists; they enjoy ?nights with the guys? and feel a stronger dedication and sense of belonging toward things like sports teams and their work than they do toward individuals, especially women. The same types of stereotypical yearning can be found in the Anglo-Saxon pieces ?The Wife's Lament? and ?The Wanderer.? In these stories, the main characters are clinging to their gender roles and are lamenting over loves lost, both sexual and platonic. In the case of ?The Wife's Lament,? the narrator is distraught over the loss of her husband and is patiently awaiting his return, and in ?The Wanderer,? the male main character feels lost without his leader and clan, and is yearning to feel a sense of belonging again. The gender roles displayed in both stores are still perpetuated in modern society, which is why even in the 21st century readers can still identify with the characters and their emotions.

[...] Football, Mead-Halls, and Bards: Perpetuated Gender Roles from Anglo-Saxon Literature In modern times, men and women in America are divided by their stereotypical gender roles. Women are inferior to men; they are interested in domestic issues and should make the men in their lives happy. Men are chauvinists; they enjoy ?nights with the guys? and feel a stronger dedication and sense of belonging toward things like sports teams and their work than they do toward individuals, especially women. The same types of stereotypical yearning can be found in the Anglo-Saxon pieces Wife's Lament? and Wanderer.? In these stories, the main characters are clinging to their gender roles and are lamenting over loves lost, both sexual and platonic. [...]


[...] Though these characters are not of the same gender, one thing is clear: they are both searching for a place, or person, that makes them feel like they are Though these were the days of traveling and wandering from place-to-place, there was always something there that brought them pleasure. In a time of blood feuds and ?peace-weaving,? having a group or individual who reminded them what it meant to belong to something was very important, and it was almost unbearable to lose this feeling. [...]

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