Search icone
Search and publish your papers
Our Guarantee
We guarantee quality.
Find out more!

From Tall Tale to Political Expression

Or download with : a doc exchange

About the author

 
Level
Advanced
Study
journalism
School/University
Eastern...

About the document

Published date
Language
documents in English
Format
Word
Type
school essay
Pages
2 pages
Level
Advanced
Accessed
0 times
Validated by
Committee Oboolo.com
0 Comment
Rate this document
  1. Introduction
  2. The similarity in the stories
  3. The political issues in the two stories
  4. Conclusion

If you read Washington Irving's tale of time, Rip Van Winkle, and Mark Twain's story of deceit, The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, you will find a ball of fantasy and tall tales with truth and logic buried in the middle. In comparing these two tales, one must look at what exactly a tall tale can contribute and represent. These tales are alike as much as they differ in their structure as well as in their points. They can also be looked at symbolically and representations of our time and the politicians we have trusted throughout history.
To begin, both of the stories express characteristics present in tall tales. These sorts of tales take on imaginative and romantic qualities that are beyond logic. In Rip Van Winkle, the title character goes to sleep for years and wakes up in good health. Now a character sleeping for that long would need some sort of food supplement in order to survive. Tall Tales combine fantasy with sorts of logic in them and this is present in the tale.

[...] The stranger in the town cons Smiley in the frog contest, and the narrator, Mark Twain, is conned by the man in to hearing his unbelievable tale when Twain is looking for fact not fiction. The two tales contain many symbolic characteristics as well. For example in Rip Van Winkle, Rip goes to sleep and awakes a whole new person. Sleep represents an unconscious journey for the character and then when they awaken from this unconscious to conscious state, they have gained insight which turns them into a new person. [...]


[...] You are supposed to be able to learn more from birds than you can from any human being, so Twain placing them in the story represents that Smiley is simply paying attention to which bird will fly away, showing that he does not care about his spirituality and soul searching. On the other hand Rip goes to sleep and awakes changed. Smiley is too concerned about winning and materialistic goods and this is shown through him preferring a bird flying away, rather than lets say, betting on which bird will land first. [...]

Similar documents you may be interested in reading.

Adaptation: The perfect adaptation

 Arts & media   |  Film studies   |  Presentation   |  08/18/2008   |   .doc   |   19 pages

The frontier in American imagination

 Politics & international   |  Political science   |  Presentation   |  01/27/2011   |   .doc   |   5 pages

Top sold for literature

Poem analysis: A Mate Can Do No Wrong by Henry Lawson

 Philosophy & literature   |  Literature   |  Case study   |  01/29/2014   |   .doc   |   3 pages

The "Sondergut" of the Gospel of Luke

 Philosophy & literature   |  Literature   |  Case study   |  05/15/2014   |   .doc   |   7 pages