Search icone
Search and publish your papers

How the Author Uses Juxtaposition of Scenes to Develop Particular Characters and Themes

Or download with : a doc exchange

About the author

 
Level
Advanced
Study
modern history
School/University
Auburn...

About the document

Published date
Language
documents in English
Format
Word
Type
school essay
Pages
3 pages
Level
Advanced
Accessed
1 times
Validated by
Committee Oboolo.com
0 Comment
Rate this document
  1. Introduction
  2. The three correlating scenes
  3. Ch'en and his companions discussing their next attempt to assassinate Chiang-Kai-shek
  4. Understanding how Ch'en can find 'the meaning of life'
  5. The use of metaphors and the juxtaposition of scenes
  6. Contemplating upon Hung's suffering
  7. Conclusion
  8. Bibliography

The authors Andre Malraux and Duong Thu Huong both use the juxtaposition of scenes that are distinctive, but at the same time linked, to provide commentary on a specific theme and to develop certain characters. In both novels, the characters contemplate their suffering and death. The two scenes juxtaposed by Duong in Memories of a Pure Spring use metaphors to deeply examine Hung's suffering. Through these two scenes that Duong also reveals to the reader a deeper understanding of Hung. She is able to implicitly illustrate the man Hung has become and foreshadow his future suffering.

[...] In this realization, Hung is transformed, he becomes lost in the sea and in it he is a different man. The Hung who sits at home is dead, but this man by the sea can hear music; nowhere else will he ever be satisfied. From this point on, Hung is a distorted figure. Yet, it is from these juxtaposed scenes that the reader receives a deeper understanding of Hung and why he is such a conflicted man throughout the rest of the novel. In the novels Memories [...]


[...] Duong also uses metaphors and the juxtaposition of scenes in Memories of a Pure Spring to create a better understanding of a character and his suffering. Hung is now living what is supposed to be a great life under new lights,? but for Hung all there is in that life is his suffering. He proclaims that under new lights' will bring profits to the others, and losses to (Duong 95). In this scene, Hung attempts to write a new music composition, but he is unable to make the first note, which he describes as being first brick in an edifice: It made way for the rest. [...]

Similar documents you may be interested in reading.

Transformers: America in disguise

 Arts & media   |  Film studies   |  Presentation   |  09/25/2008   |   .doc   |   8 pages

The water babies, Victorian literature and the depiction of childhood

 Philosophy & literature   |  Literature   |  Term papers   |  02/16/2010   |   .doc   |   13 pages

Top sold for literature

Rise to Globalism: American Foreign Policy Since 1938

 Philosophy & literature   |  Literature   |  Book review   |  07/08/2013   |   .pdf   |   2 pages

Freudian Psychology and Euripides's The Bacchae

 Philosophy & literature   |  Literature   |  School essay   |  12/17/2007   |   .doc   |   3 pages