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  1. Nagasawa and Kashiwagi.
  2. Similarity between these two characters
  3. Importance of the characters to the plot of the book
  4. Toru and Tsurukawa.
  5. Similarity between Tsurukawa and Toru
  6. Conclusion

Although the books, Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami and Temple of the Golden Pavilion, by Yukio Mishima, are completely different works, both have uncannily similar characters. Each main character from these two books has at least one character in the other book who shares some of their traits. Some characters are easier to relate than others; therefore, I will be giving both similarities between characters, and differences. This should help to clarify how these characters can remain similar, yet come from completely different time periods, and completely different stories.

[...] He feels that it is his obligation to do this because it is an ability that he has. Kashiwagi uses his clubbed feet to attract women. By making himself look even more decrepit that what he really is, he draws on the motherly emotions of women and exploits them to ultimately get them into bed with him. Unlike Nagasawa, Kashiwagi acts this way, not out of a sense of obligation, but because he feels that it is owed to him. [...]


[...] of them is attracted to their story's protagonist, because they feel that they have something in common with him. Nagasawa mistakenly thinks that Toru feels nothing for people or things, and that he does things because he can. Sadly, I think this just indicates Nagasawa's need to find someone who is more like him. This need is easily identified in the book by the lack of friends that Nagasawa has. Peculiarly, he ends up befriending the protagonist merely from leaning that Toru enjoys The Great Gatsby. [...]

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