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Medea

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  1. Aristotle's four requirements for tragic characters
    1. The characters should be good
    2. They should be appropriate
    3. The character should be life - like
    4. The character should be consistent
  2. The atrocities that Medea commits
  3. Coclusion

When first comparing the play Medea and Aristotle's Poetics, many people feel that the lead character, Medea, breaks every requirement for being a tragic character. But when we take a step back and view Medea at a different angle, we see that she does actually fit every aspect of Aristotle's tragic character definition. Medea is essentially a good character, she is an appropriate character, she is life like, and she is in most ways, consistent.

[...] In this respect, as in her preoccupation with marriage, Medea is not the bloody, passionate, and transgressive barbarian sorceress of myth, but a stereotypical Greek woman This also shows that Medea is not a cruel, or evil woman, but a woman with no other alternatives. ?Medea: No! I shall bury them with my own hands. I'll take them to the shrine of Hera Akraia; that way no hostile person can do outrage tot hem by the desecration of their tomb. [...]


[...] Medea When first comparing the play Medea and Aristotle's Poetics, many people feel that the lead character, Medea, breaks every requirement for being a tragic character. But when we take a step back and view Medea at a different angle, we see that she does actually fit every aspect of Aristotle's tragic character definition. Medea is essentially a good character, she is an appropriate character, she is life like, and she is in most ways, consistent. In Poetics, Aristotle assigns four requirements for tragic characters. [...]

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