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The Rise and Fall of Satan

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  1. Introduction
  2. Milton's portrayal of Satan
  3. Satan's greatest character flaw
  4. Size and symbolism in book 1
  5. Conclusion

In Book 1 of John Milton's Paradise Lost, Satan's character is borderline glorified as a military hero, despite his juxtaposition to the lord and creator, his nemesis, God. Regardless of this, Satan's essence is evil, sly, and dishonest. Banished from heaven as a result his army's defeat from God's forces, Satan and his army were cast to a lake that gives off ?darkness instead of light.? This is symbolic of their dark, ominous nature. Even after witnessing the power of God and his army, Satan does not repent against his rebellion against God, and even plots to pervert God's will to evil. Satan's character is complex, intelligent, and persistent. Despite these admirable traits, his flawed character traits are what eventually bring him down.

[...] The rise and fall of Satan is a process that is sluggish, but progressive. As previously stated, Satan begins in Book 1 as a powerful, fearless, and insistent leader that has control over his men. When his men get down or doubtful, he is there to reassure them that unwavering evil will prevail over good, even if it is one small at a time. His desire to deprave good into evil is what is constantly on his mind, and despite the fact that many of his men and followers are doubtful. [...]


[...] The Rise and Fall of Satan In Book 1 of John Milton's Paradise Lost, Satan's character is borderline glorified as a military hero, despite his juxtaposition to the lord and creator, his nemesis, God. Regardless of this, Satan's essence is evil, sly, and dishonest. Banished from heaven as a result his army's defeat from God's forces, Satan and his army were cast to a lake that gives off ?darkness instead of light.? This is symbolic of their dark, ominous nature. [...]

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