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The Ultimate Usefulness of Freedom

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  1. Introduction
  2. The center of much of Kant's social and moral philosophy
  3. The free, universal and progressive society
  4. The idea of the separation of church and state
  5. Republican constitution
  6. Bibliography

Kant's views on social and moral progress have always been described as being ?ahead of his time,? probably because of the emphasis on freedom in many of his works. According to Kant, freedom is absolutely necessary for any kind of progress. Freedom is almost always tied to reason, and our ability to make use of our own reason. Indeed, the motto of Kant's time was ?Have courage to use your own reason.?

[...] The Ultimate Usefulness of Freedom Kant's views on social and moral progress have always been described as being ?ahead of his probably because of the emphasis on freedom in many of his works. According to Kant, freedom is absolutely necessary for any kind of progress. Freedom is almost always tied to reason, and our ability to make use of our own reason. Indeed, the motto of Kant's time was ?Have courage to use your own reason.? In his essay ?What is Enlightenment,? he argues that only freedom is granted, enlightenment is almost sure to follow.? It takes a free mind to be an enlightened mind, and for Kant, every enlightened mind is a step toward progress. [...]


[...] This is why, Kant explains, the constitution of the Universal Civic Society must be republican. A republican constitution will also work toward the goal of peace, Kant explains: The republican constitution, besides the purity of its origin . also gives a favorable prospect for the desired consequence, i.e., perpetual peace. The reason is this: if the consent of the citizens is required in order to decide that war should be declared . nothing is more natural than that they would be very cautious in commencing such a poor game, decreeing for themselves all the calamities of war . [...]

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