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Theme of the lost generation- International Relations, Analysis

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  1. Introduction
  2. III. Causes of the rise of the lost generation and their effects include the following factors
    1. The result of the First World War
    2. Transition of society and modernization
    3. Vigorous attempts to establish new rules
  3. Conclusion

The lost generation is a term that has spread out its roots into the ages of history between 1500 and 1950, during and after the World War 1. Following the pressure and the need for state and individual freedom globally, young and energetic men found themselves in the battlefield, armed for war. Consequently, many culprits returned mentally or physically wounded. In more worsening situations, several deaths were witnessed, particularly in Britain. This contrasted the belief of many European soldiers that once they acted virtuously, victory automatically followed.

Their strong faith on this mentality had build a strong hope amongst the citizens of Britain that gradually expired on witnessing such tremendous loss. Signs of the great depression could be read on the remnants' faces as a result of numerous injuries and deaths of war casualties. According to (Thompson, 1994) the country's elite had been robbed off by the disproportionate death of the upper-class casualties. This paper outlines a thorough examination of the causes of the loss of such a promising generation.

[...] For instance, they would offer gifts, products of their industries, to their congregation thus promoting the marketing of their finished goods. They also offered employment opportunities to the literates from schools which they built and managed with the aim of making the existing relationship with their ?rivals' smooth (Modelski, 1989). Since Europe had advanced in science and technology, their intelligence was incomparable. At their investing bases, they could sense the insecurity that awaited their premises due to the unsatisfactory that could be read from the faces of the indigenous. [...]


[...] In the maturity, they earned to coexist with other members of the society, and perhaps accepted that the society existed the way that it did for a reason. Bibliography Hutton, B. (2013). English teachers notes; theme the lost generation. Teacher's notes all. Hutton, B. (2013). History pupil's notes.Pupil's notes all. Retrieved May from https://www.google.com/search?q=the+lost+generation+after+ww1/pdf&hl=en &noj=1&ei=eBKQUam0MMLa4ATc1YCoCQ&start=10&sa=N&biw=1366&bih=643 Modelski, G. (2000); International Relations: Critical Concepts in Political Science, London: Routledge 214), 1340-60. [...]


[...] Causes of the rise of the lost generation and their effects include the following factors The result of the First World War Transition of society and modernization Vigorous attempts to establish new rules IV. Conclusion Abstract The lost generation is a term that has spread out its roots into the ages of history between 1500 and 1950, during and after the World War 1. Following the pressure and the need for state and individual freedom globally, young and energetic men found themselves in the battlefield, armed for war. [...]


[...] Their own race occupied the very top positions in the hierarchy. This served a sole authority in governance, guaranteeing maximum security unto their life and property. This sort of administration also gave them commands overall territorial fortune and the access to its boundaries. Permeability of these territorial boundaries allowed for free and non-questionable movements of goods, machines and individuals (Thompson, 2000). The combination of all the ?ill' deeds exhibited by the Europeans as discussed above prompted the opponents' curiosity to bring the Britons' superiority into falling apart. [...]


[...] When she began sensing defeat, she incorporated Spain and Portugal all against Britain soldiers. The war deepened and lengthened as the Britain soldiers depicted signs of victory (Thompson, 2000). France felt humiliated and thus stretched out her hand to the United States of America. The United States being at the same level economically and politically as the Britain incorporated most of her military into the battle. In conjunction with France, Portuguese and Spanish troops, America did her best to outdo the Britain. [...]

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