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The political theory of totalitarianism and its relationship to terrorism:A discussion on the relationship between totalitarianism and terrorism in the context of political theory

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  1. Abstract.
  2. Introduction.
  3. Defining Totalitarianism.
    1. The roots of Totalitarianism.
    2. The causes of Totalitarianism.
  4. The political theories of Totalitarianism.
    1. Communist terror in Soviet Russia.
    2. Nazi terror in Germany.
  5. Defining terrorism.
    1. The causes of Terrorism.
    2. Religion.
    3. Rebellious intellectual elite.
  6. Investigating the relationship of Totalitarianism and Terrorism.
  7. Conclusions.

Throughout the twentieth century the concept of Totalitarianism has functioned on political, moral, religious and theoretical level. Designating regimes that maintain themselves in political power by means of propaganda, state-controlled media and economy and restriction of free speech, Totalitarianism extensively uses terror tactics.Terrorism is political violence performed by non-State actors. By conveying a distorted ideology, terrorism orders for massive destruction of institutions, foundations and national symbols representing thoughts and ideas which do not comply with common sense.This paper investigates the relationship between Totalitarianism and Terrorism in the context of Political Theory. Their fundamental relationship is reflected on their roots. Terrorism |evolves as a result of social inequalities, religious conflicts and a rebellious intelligentsia, while similarly, Totalitarianism takes advantage of social inequalities and offers a sense of individual existence to deprived people, who adhered to this ideology. By investigating this relationship in the context of Political Theory, the paper identifies similarities between Totalitarianism and Terrorism in the use of terror tactics, obsession with control, relation to religion and the use of advanced technology

[...] Reflections on a Ravaged. Century. ISBN 0-393-04818-7 Evans, J.R. (2005). The Coming of the Third Reich. New York: Penguin Books. ISBN-13: 978-0143034698 Guelke, A. (1995). The age of terrorism and the international political system. London, UK. I.B. Tauris. Hassenfeld, N.I. (2002). Doctor?Patient Relations in Nazi Germany and the Fate of Psychiatric Patients. Psychiatric Quarterly, Springer Netherlands, Volume 73, Number 3 / Sep Hoffer, E. (2002). The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements. Harper Perennial Modern Classics, ISBN 0060505915 Hoffman, B. [...]


[...] Considering the diverse forms and the contradictory interpretations provided on the grounds of using extreme, anti-social and inhuman activities in certain environments, terrorism is broadly defined as structured brutality with the intention to cause fear and insecurity of citizens and to threaten the State authority or achieve other political goals (Milosevic & Stajic, 1998). In addition, the term refers to abuse and it is closely associated to outrage against social injustice. Shultz considers that terrorism is a war against ordinary citizens and that terrorists serve as grim reminders that democracy is fragile and needs to be guarded with vigilance (Shultz, 1986). [...]


[...] The fundamental relationship between Totalitarianism and Terrorism is the fact Terrorism evolves as a result of social inequalities, religious conflicts and a rebellious intelligentsia, while similarly, Totalitarianism takes advantage of social inequalities and offers a sense of individual existence to deprived people, who adhered to this ideology. By investigating this relationship in the context of Political Theory, the paper identifies similarities between Totalitarianism and Terrorism in the use of terror tactics, obsession with control, relation to religion and the use of advanced technology. Both Totalitarianism and Terrorism bear a psychological extension. Their terror techniques and overall dogma is subject to an excessive demand of power from people, who desperately need to trade off own deprivations. [...]

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