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Ideal and Not Ideal Leaders

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  1. Introduction
  2. Ralph treatment of others
  3. Jack loss of reality
  4. Ralph and Jack: Leaders of the group
  5. Conclusion

An ideal leader is an intellect, an analyzer, an interpreter. He will not bend to the demand of the public solely for their approval of him, nor will he drift down the path of corruption. An ideal leader has strong character, a crafty personality and an admirable demeanor. He is patient, empathetic and perceptive. Over the years he has attained experience and is knowledgeable of history and the flaws in human decision. He thus understands the past is the future if mistakes made in the past are repeated. An ideal leader does not wish to be a leader for he grasps the concept of all humans being fallible. Through his eyes, power leads to corruption, dishonesty, and unwillingness to change. From what he has seen, a leader in a realistic realm is the epitome of the devil in an ideal realm. He feels such a diabolic leader is voracious and gluttonous for influence and authority. His decisions are a parallel of the decisions made in the past, which had once lead as they will once lead to disastrous consequences. Thus, life has taught him nothing. Although Ralph and Jack may appear to be leaders to the rest of the crew in Lord of the Flies, they both lack the qualities of an ideal leader. While Ralph's perceptions for what is essential for survival are obscured by a constant power struggle with Jack, Jack has the qualities of a dictator from the beginning and cares for nothing more than holding his position for the sake of giving orders. Towards the end, both boys lose a willingness to attain their goal of survival. An ideal leader will not aberrate from working towards his aforedecided goals.

[...] Although Jack is not an ideal leader, he is incredibly shrewd. Jack wins the boys over through manipulation. He recognizes their weakness as hunger, and he invites them to ?hunt and feast and have (140) with his hunters. With saliva dribbling down their chins, the boys agree without hesitation to join his clan. With more boys joining his hunters, his power expands into a dictatorship and he too becomes corrupted. From this point on, Jack intimidates the young boys into obedience, who fear the consequences of his wrath. [...]


[...] Ideal and Not Ideal Leaders An ideal leader is an intellect, an analyzer, an interpreter. He will not bend to the demand of the public solely for their approval of him, nor will he drift down the path of corruption. An ideal leader has strong character, a crafty personality and an admirable demeanor. He is patient, empathetic and perceptive. Over the years he has attained experience and is knowledgeable of history and the flaws in human decision. He thus understands the past is the future if mistakes made in the past are repeated. [...]

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