Search icone
Search and publish your papers

The woman suffrage movement in Canada and liberation deferred? The ideas of the English-Canadian Suffragists, 1877-1918: A comparative book review

Or download with : a doc exchange

About the author

 
Level
General public
Study
social...
School/University
University...

About the document

Published date
Language
documents in English
Format
Word
Type
book reviews
Pages
6 pages
Level
General public
Accessed
0 times
Validated by
Committee Oboolo.com
0 Comment
Rate this document
  1. Introduction
  2. Catherine Lyle Cleverdon's argument
  3. Analysis of Quebec's journey towards suffrage
  4. Canada's experience with the suffrage movement
  5. The formulation of the Canadian Constitution
  6. Conclusion
  7. References

In her work entitled The Woman Suffrage Movement in Canada, Catherine Lyle Cleverdon artfully constructs narrative analysis of a social movement that gained little notoriety outside of Canada. This particular study is extremely helpful because of its ability to use existing information about the suffrage movement in Canada and build upon those facts in order to enhance the reader's understanding of the social development itself. While the suffrage movement in Canada was not nearly as dramatic or notable as the corresponding movement in England, the author does a thorough job of explicating the social merits of both movements and why both were crucial to the unfolding of Canadian history specifically. In contrast, Carol Lee Bacchi takes a different approach with her book Liberation Deferred? The Ideas of the English-Canadian Suffragists, 1877-1918, as she seems concerned with reinforcing the idea that the female suffragists did not necessarily fail to induce a social revolution, but rather those individuals in support of this movement never truly had a revolution in mind, but rather a gradual and progressive reform of a system that did not recognize its Canadian women as citizens. Bacchi implies that woman's suffrage was not violent and highly-publicized event that demanded immediate change, but instead was the result of continuous pressure of Canadian women striving for social change. This supposition actually aligns somewhat with Cleverdon's thesis regarding the non-violence of the suffrage movement in Canada compared to the progress of its counterparts in the United States and England. Despite the vague similarity between both texts, Cleverdon invokes a kind of narrative with her work and relies upon characterization to convey a level of passion that maintains the interest of the reader, while Bacchi does not, and instead relies almost entirely on objective fact to explicate the evolution of woman suffrage in Canada.

[...] Imagined Communities: Reflections on the origins and spread of nationalism. (New York and London: Verso; rev. ed., 1991), pp. 1-36, 61-65. Bacchi, C.L. (1982). Liberation Deferred? The Ideas of the English- Canadian Suffragists, 1877-1918. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Cleverdon, C.L. (1975) The Woman [...]


[...] While Cleverdon was able to infuse some level of passion into her work through the animation of her characters, Bacchi is unable to inspire the same level of enthusiasm regarding the importance of this social movement for the betterment of Canadian history. Yet it could also be argued that each text serves a specific purpose, as Bacchi's text provides the reader with objective historical facts unencumbered by any authorial embellishment or mediation, while Cleverdon's creative characterizations create an exciting text that is much more accessible to a new student hoping to familiarize him or herself with the importance of suffrage to the advancement of women's rights in Canada . References Anderson, B. (1991). [...]


[...] The Ideas of the English- Canadian Suffragists, 1877-1918, Carol Lee Bacchi takes a slightly different approach to representing the suffrage movement than Catherine Cleverdon, as this author seems preoccupied with the notion of success and failure in the suffrage movement. In actuality, she seems concerned with clarifying the idea that the female suffragists did not necessary fail to induce a social revolution, but rather those individuals in support of this movement never truly had a revolution in mind. That is to say, Bacchi suggests that the movement itself was not necessarily a violent and highly- publicized event that demanded immediate change, but instead was the result of continuous pressure of Canadian women striving for social change. [...]

Top sold for social sciences

Cultural diversity

 Politics & international   |  Social sciences   |  Presentation   |  02/05/2009   |   .doc   |   5 pages

SWOT analysis on National Society of the Prevention Cruelty to Children's Online Program

 Politics & international   |  Social sciences   |  Term papers   |  05/30/2009   |   .doc   |   4 pages

Recent documents in social sciences category

Different methods of birth control and their history

 Politics & international   |  Social sciences   |  Presentation   |  01/13/2017   |   .doc   |   2 pages

Description of Value-Based Purchasing (VBP)

 Politics & international   |  Social sciences   |  Presentation   |  11/28/2016   |   .doc   |   2 pages