Search icone
Search and publish your papers

Future of tobacco industry post tobacco ban

Or download with : a doc exchange

About the author

Level
Expert

About the document

Published date
Language
documents in English
Format
Word
Type
research papers
Pages
40 pages
Level
Expert
Accessed
2 times
Validated by
Committee Oboolo.com
0 Comment
Rate this document
  1. Introduction: Big tobacco's global expansion
  2. Global tobacco players
    1. Philip Morris, Bat and RJ Reynolds
  3. Factors responsible for overseas expansion
  4. Indicators of cigarette industry performance
    1. U.S. markets
    2. World markets
  5. Leading world cigarette markets on a country-by-country basis
  6. The cigar industry
    1. Players in the cigar industry
    2. The big four cigar players
  7. Findings about the US cigar industry
  8. Advertising ill health
  9. Legal position of smoking in various countries of the world
  10. Future of the tobacco industry
  11. The tobacco market
  12. Sports and entertainment sponsorship
  13. The free tobacco trade
  14. The network threats: NAFTA, WTO, and the MAI
  15. Framework convention on tobacco control - FCTC
  16. Conclusion

Americans spend an estimated $51.9 billion on tobacco products in 1997, or just under 1% of their disposable income. Of this amount, $48.7 billion (or 94%) was spent on cigarettes, $2.2 billion on smokeless and smoking tobacco, and $0.9 billion on cigars.

Cigarette production in the United States is largely concentrated in the hands of three firms: Philip Morris, RJR Nabisco, and Brown & Williamson. These firms accounted for about 90% of total production in 1996. Domestic sales of major U.S. firms (namely, Philip Morris and RJR Nabisco) grew very little over the period 1992-1996. International sales, on the other hand, increased more rapidly during this period, indicating that these firms are giving high priority to increasing cigarette sales abroad, given the diminished growth potential of the U.S. market in recent years. Cigarette production in the United States registered only a slight gain (0.2%) over 1992-1997. However, cigarette consumption on a per capita basis declined by about 9%. The U.S. share of world production of cigarettes declined from 13.4% to 12.6% over the period 1992-1997. The U.S. share of world exports also declined from 26% to 21% in the same period.

China is by far the largest producer of cigarettes in the world; the second largest producer is the United States. In 1997 China produced an estimated 1.7 trillion pieces, almost two and one half times the 720 billion pieces produced in the United States. The United States is by far the largest cigarette exporting nation in the world, with exports in 1997 estimated about 217 billion pieces, or 21% of the world total. China is the largest consumer market in the world, with over 300 million smokers consuming 1.7 trillion cigarettes in 1997. Its market, however, is basically closed to foreign exporters. China's desire to become a member of the World Trade Organization, eventually could lead to an opening of its market to cigarette imports.
Like the cigarette industry, the smokeless tobacco industry (including the production of snuff and chewing tobacco) is highly concentrated among a few firms: U.S. Tobacco Company, Conwood Company, and Pinkerton Tobacco Company. In 1996 the companies accounted for abut 83% of total industry sales. The production of chewing tobacco declined by 16% over the 1992-1997 period while the output of snuff products increased by 11%. This rise was due entirely to the increase in the output of moist snuff products.

[...] MAJOR FINDINGS ABOUT THE US TOBACCO INDUSTRY This review and analysis of the domestic and international operations, production and sales of the U. S. tobacco industry over the period 1992- 1997 has produced a number of significant findings. These include the following: Cigarette production in the United States is largely concentrated in the hands of three firms: Philip Morris, RJR Nabisco, and Brown & Williamson. These firms accounted for about 90% of total production in 1997. Domestic sales of major U.S. [...]


[...] FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON TOBACCO CONTROL (FCTC) On the bittersweet day of May 21, the tobacco industry both faced the adoption of the World Health Organization's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) and celebrated the decertification of the Engle trial. After four years of negotiations, the FCTC was adopted by all 192 member countries. Now, it is up to the member countries to ratify the treaty. The treaty must be signed and ratified by at least 40 countries in order for it to take effect. [...]


[...] Like the cigarette industry, the smokeless tobacco industry (including the production of snuff and chewing tobacco) is highly concentrated among a few firms: U.S. Tobacco Company, Conwood Company and Pinkerton Tobacco Company. In 1997 the companies accounted for about 83% of total industry sales. The production of chewing tobacco declined by 16% over the 1992-1997 period while the output of snuff products increased by 11%. This rise was due entirely to the increase in the output of moist snuff products. [...]

Similar documents you may be interested in reading.

The impact of Foreign Direct Investment on the retail industry in India

 Economics & finance   |  Finance   |  Thesis   |  05/26/2009   |   .doc   |   102 pages

Tobacco industry

 Business & market   |  Marketing   |  Market study   |  09/29/2010   |   .doc   |   14 pages

Top sold for social sciences

Cultural diversity

 Politics & international   |  Social sciences   |  Presentation   |  02/05/2009   |   .doc   |   5 pages

SWOT analysis on National Society of the Prevention Cruelty to Children's Online Program

 Politics & international   |  Social sciences   |  Term papers   |  05/30/2009   |   .doc   |   4 pages