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The Fourteen Points

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  1. Introduction
  2. European countries at the end of World war I
  3. President Woodrow Wilson's plan for peace
  4. The reaction to Wilson's fourteen points
  5. Conclsuion

The Fourteen Points, the proposals of President Woodrow Wilson, were designed to establish the basis for a just and lasting peace following the victory of the Allies in World War I. The proposals were contained in Wilson's address to a joint session of the U.S. Congress in January of 1918, detailing his plans for worldwide reforms. The ideas expressed in them were widely acclaimed and gave Wilson a position of moral leadership among the Allied leaders.

[...] The first five points dealt with general problems: open covenants of peace were to be openly arrived at and in the public view; freedom on the sea was assured; all economic barriers were to be removed; national armaments were to be reduced; and colonial claims were to be adjusted according to impartial standards of justice? (Mee 11). The next eight points dealt with specific issues: how to deal with Russia and Belgium, Alsace-Lorraine should be returned to France, a ?readjustment of the frontiers of Italy should be effected along clearly recognizable lines of nationality,? the people of Austria-Hungary should be granted freedom to develop their government, Rumania, Serbia, and Montenegro should be evacuated, the Turkish portions of the Ottoman Empire should be assured a ?secure sovereignty,? and an independent Polish nation was to be established (Duffy 2). [...]


[...] The Fourteen Points The Fourteen Points, the proposals of President Woodrow Wilson, were designed to establish the basis for a just and lasting peace following the victory of the Allies in World War I. The proposals were contained in Wilson's address to a joint session of the U.S. Congress in January of 1918, detailing his plans for worldwide reforms. The ideas expressed in them were widely acclaimed and gave Wilson a position of moral leadership among the Allied leaders. At the end of World War the European countries remained hostile to one another. [...]

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