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The logic methods and the power structure of speeches

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  1. Introduction
  2. Power structure of speeches
  3. The will and the duty
  4. Pleasure as a means and as an end
  5. Conclusion

Several called social discourse, that is, speeches whose recipient is a public. The scientific discourse, legal discourse, political discourse, media discourse, the advertising discourse, religious discourse, the artistic discourse, pedagogic discourse, among others, are all examples of speeches aimed at the general public.

Therefore, we can say that the activities that characterize the - science, art, religion, politics, journalism, advertising, teaching, law - are public activities.

Each of these activities has a different social role assigned to it by the company. The specific social function of each activity, that is, mode of action, the purpose and the target audience of this activity, determines certain characteristics typical of his speeches, certain constants and constraints that set a standard, that is, a model to be followed by any discourse produced by such activity.

[...] If we go to the theater or the cinema, for example, is purely in search of fun and excitement; even if these shows can also play an informative or educational role, its main function is fun, that is, give pleasure. REFERENCES Bizzocchi, AL Culture and pleasure: the place of science. Science and Culture, Vol no January / February 1999, pp 26-33. GARVIN, P. L. Linguistic School of Prague. In: HILL, AA (ed.) Aspects of modern linguistics. Sao Paulo, Cultrix 1974. [...]


[...] Pleasure as a means and as an end Any human activity can provide pleasure. Thus, every professional can - and indeed should - taking pleasure in exercising his office, but we note that only the cultural activities the pleasure of professional is effectively shared with your audience. There is a function of a doctor, for example, give pleasure to their patients; medicine exists prior to relieve pain. Similarly, it is not basic task of a teacher produce pleasure in students. [...]


[...] What will determine the hedonic or pragmatic character of an activity is its predominant task. In terms of logical rules, the pragmatic function will result in power do not suffer, which will simplify the expression can provide, while the hedonic function is represented by the modality able to enjoy or, more simply, power pleases. If it is true that the ultimate purpose of human existence is the meeting of pleasure, then we can say that the hedonic activities are core activities, as leading directly to pleasure, while the pragmatic activities are middle-activities, which fulfill the first step in pursuit of pleasure: the elimination of sources of displeasure. [...]


[...] The logic methods and the power structure of speeches Several called social discourse, that is, speeches whose recipient is a public. The scientific discourse, legal discourse, political discourse, media discourse, the advertising discourse, religious discourse, the artistic discourse, pedagogic discourse, among others, are all examples of speeches aimed at the general public. Therefore, we can say that the activities that characterize the - science, art, religion, politics, journalism, advertising, teaching, law - are public activities. Each of these activities has a different social role assigned to it by the company. [...]


[...] In many cases, the predominance of one goal over the other is so great as to make negligible secondary objective. Therefore, there are many activities that mix hedonism and pragmatism in varying doses, while there are other almost exclusively hedonic or pragmatic. Take for example the need for travel, while it is in principle a need, this activity may be more or less pleasant as is done on foot, by bus, by own car, luxury car, etc. As has been said, all human action is motivated by a need and a will; the difference is one of degree. [...]

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