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Methamphetamines

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  1. Introduction to methamphetamines.
  2. Dispersion.
  3. Effects.
  4. Long term.
  5. Conclusion.

In 1927, the U.S. medical community began to use ephedrine, which is the active ingredient in ma haung, a plant, to open bronchial passages in patients with asthma. As the supplies of naturally occurring Ephedra vulgaris began to dwindle, pharmaceutical companies began to search for a synthetic alternative. Amphetamine was first synthesized in 1887, but because there was very little interest in it, the substance went unnoticed until it became the alternative to ephedrine (Feldman et al., 1997). By the 1930s, all the major effects of amphetamine were known. While researching the effects, it was discovered that amphetamines could awaken dogs that were under anesthesia. This discovery led to the use of amphetamines, in pill form, to treat narcolepsy

[...] Methamphetamines also trigger seriously aggressive behavior, especially if the user feels threatened. Physical effects of the stimulant properties of methamphetamines can lead to major physical complications such as heart damage, strokes, and life-threatening fevers. Methamphetamines are similar to other stimulant drugs in how they produce addiction. There is a powerful conditioning effect. The brain learns to associate a pleasurable sensation with all kinds of cues connected to the use of the drug. During the early period of abstinence, as with cocaine, the addict has to deal with powerful cravings that are a result of this learning process. [...]


[...] People with tolerance to the stimulant effects may be able to work inexhaustibly for 10-20 hours. Other individuals may experience severe agitation, anxiety, hallucinations, and delusions of persecution. As the stimulation wears off, the user experiences extraordinary depression, craving for more drug, and lethargy. (Chesley, 1999) Methamphetamines are similar to other stimulant drugs in how they produce addiction. There is a powerful conditioning effect. The brain learns to associate a pleasurable sensation with all kinds of cues connected to the use of the drug. [...]


[...] (2006) "Strengthening the Case for Workplace Drug Testing: The Growing Problem of Methamphetamines." SAM Adv. Mgmt Journ. 4-11. Feldman, R.S., Meyer, J.S., and Quenzer, L.F. (1997). Principles of Neuropsychopharmacology. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer Associates, Inc. Honolulu Star-Bulletin. (2002). "Arrested males on 'ice' top Honolulu outpaces 36 other big cities in its incidence of 'ice' use." Wednesday, June 12: 6. Miczek, K.A. and Tidey, J.W. (1989). "Amphetamines: aggressive and social behavior." NIDA Res. Monogr. Ser., 94: 68-100. Moro, M., Salvador, A., and Simon, V.M. [...]

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