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Algebra in the real world and everyday life

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  1. Introduction
  2. A Formula Used in Everyday Life Events
  3. A Linear Equation or Slope Used in Everyday Life
  4. Algebra in Business or Science
  5. A Sequence or Series of Events in Real Life
  6. Conclusion

Many people find math and math concepts difficult to grasp. They don't understand how to do it or why something is equal to something else for example. The biggest issue though for people taking math, especially higher levels of math is the purpose of taking such a class. What or when will they ever use it? This question has even been asked by this author at times. Throughout this particular math course though, the author has begun to see the purpose of math and how math can be applied to everyday life situations. By applying math in this way; to one's own life experiences, the concepts have been easier to grasp. In this paper, by looking at everyday life examples such as formulas, linear equations/slope, algebra in business and science, and finally sequences and series, the author can conclude that people actually do use math concepts learned in school every day without even realizing it.

Usually when one thinks of formulas in relation to Algebraic equations, they envision long equations with many numbers and letters that only people like mathematicians would understand. Often times though, formulas are used in everyday life without even realizing that one has just used one. For example, one simple formula this author uses is when the author buys something on sale at the store and has to figure out how much an item will cost after the discount. An eighty dollar dress at Macy's is on sale for fifteen percent of the original price.

[...] Often times though, formulas are used in everyday life without even realizing that one has just used one. For example, one simple formula this author uses is when the author buys something on sale at the store and has to figure out how much an item will cost after the discount. An eighty dollar dress at Macy's is on sale for fifteen percent of the original price. Excluding sales tax, one can figure this out by setting the amount x over (divide) the original amount eighty, equal to the percent fifteen in decimal form over one hundred. [...]


[...] dollar is equal to 98.43 Jamaican dollars. Let exchange equal 98.43 Jamaican dollars multiplied by the amount of U.S. dollars that want to be exchanged. So the equation looks like this: E = 98.43 d. So to figure out how many Jamaican dollars my mother would get from her twenty dollar bill, substitute the d for the twenty and you will see that she would receive $ 1968.60 in Jamaican dollars. If continued with other amounts of currency, this would create a plot of points, which could easily be graphed as a line. [...]

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