Search icone
Search and publish your papers

Bipolar Disorder as depicted in the film Mr. Jones”, Using Films for Healing

Or download with : a doc exchange

About the author

Programmer/writer
Level
General public
Study
computer...
School/University
Camridge...

About the document

Published date
Language
documents in English
Format
Word
Type
case study
Pages
4 pages
Level
General public
Accessed
0 times
Validated by
Committee Oboolo.com
0 Comment
Rate this document
  1. The film Mr. Jones
  2. Signs and Symptoms
  3. Axis diagnosis
  4. Causes
  5. Treatment
  6. Ethical Issues
  7. Conclusion

?Mr. Jones? is a film centered on a man diagnosed with a psychological condition, bipolar condition, and admitted to a psychiatry care-giving centre. The main actor in the film is Mr. Jones (played by Richard Gere, a charismatic man with a bipolar condition. At first, there is an incorrect diagnosis, but upon his release, he is involved in a disruptive scenario (at the music theatre) and rearrested. He is readmitted and correctly diagnosed. In a time, he becomes romantically involved with Doctor Elizabeth Bowen, his psychiatrist. The film depicts the symptoms and treatment of the bipolar condition as well as the causes. It also demonstrates ethical issues and their consequences, if a patient becomes involved with their psychiatrist.

The bipolar disorder, also regularly known as manic depression is a psychological illness (Rosqvist, 2012). The patient experiences extreme mood swings between extreme highs and lows. Rapid onsets and recovery of extreme moods characterize the condition. The changes are sometimes gradual, depending on the triggering stimulus. The extreme moods alternate or occur simultaneously. Highs, called mania, and lows called depressions alternate, or one state predominates. The changes in moods and temperament are high, from sadness to happiness, from optimistic to hopelessness and back again. There are often periods of normal temperament in between the changes. In these periods on apparent normalcy, a patient functions like a normal member of the society and may even be productive (Rosqvist, 2012). These mood changes are however not normal. They are very severe and result in broken relationships, social problems, poor performance and suicide in extreme cases.

[...] He charms the teller, a woman named Susan into joining him for the day. He proceeds to give her $100 note, as will need it to take him out." He is also very generous to a fast food vendor and a bellboy. He demonstrates destructive ability in spending all his money in a single day doing unnecessary and extravagant thing. He demonstrates an ability to let his feeling get out of control in the evening. In a musical concert, he gets so carried away with the music playing that he proceeds to the stage and attempts to wrestle the control of the group from the conductor, convinced that he has better ability to play than the conductor; demonstrating ability overrated his abilities symptom of bipolar symptom). [...]


[...] In the film, there is a wrong initial diagnosis. After the correct diagnosis and subsequent hospitalization, he receives several sessions of psychotherapy and lithium medication. The treatment and psychotherapy are effective, until his involvement with Doctor Bowen and her subsequent resignation. Mr. Jones becomes very upset about her absence, stops all treatment, and checks himself out of the hospital. Ethical Issues Ethics is a code of conduct put in place to ensure proper conduct (McCabe, 2010). The psychiatrist, Doctor Elizabeth Bowen engages in unethical behavior several times in the film. [...]


[...] The bipolar disorder, also regularly known as manic depression is a psychological illness (Rosqvist, 2012). The patient experiences extreme mood swings between extreme highs and lows. Rapid onsets and recovery of extreme moods characterize the condition. The changes are sometimes gradual, depending on the triggering stimulus. The extreme moods alternate or occur simultaneously. Highs, called mania, and lows called depressions alternate, or one state predominates. The changes in moods and temperament are high, from sadness to happiness, from optimistic to hopelessness and back again. [...]


[...] However, the movie fails to document the causes of the disorder. Bibliography McCabe, Paul C., and Steven R. Shaw. Psychiatric disorders analysis: current topics and interventions outline for educators. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Corwin: Print. Wolz, Birgit, Ph.D., and MFT. "Mr. Jones." Cinematherapy.com: Using Films for Healing and Growth. N.p., n.d. Web Mar Bipolar Disorder as depicted in the film Mr. [...]

Top sold for educational studies

The hippie counterculture and its impact on the American society

 Social studies   |  Educational studies   |  Case study   |  01/07/2013   |   .doc   |   7 pages

Why did the Tory party's electoral fortune revive between 1874 and 1900?

 Social studies   |  Educational studies   |  Case study   |  06/28/2013   |   .doc   |   5 pages

Recent documents in educational studies category

Individual differences in second language learning

 Social studies   |  Educational studies   |  Presentation   |  04/16/2019   |   .doc   |   2 pages

Legacy preference in America

 Social studies   |  Educational studies   |  Presentation   |  06/08/2018   |   .doc   |   7 pages