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Cosmic creation myths across cultures

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  1. Introduction
  2. Norse Myth of Creation
  3. Aboriginal Creation Myth
  4. Conclusion

According to Norse Mythology, what is referred to as the planet Earth was once Ginnungagap. Ginnungagap is the Great Emptiness. South of Gunnunugagp was the firey realm of Muspell. Muspell only had lakes of fire and rivers of poison. The fiery pit prevented any type of growth to emerge. North of Ginnungagp was Niflheim. Niflheim's was dark and very cold; so cold that the rivers were frozen. This northern area also prevented any type of planet growth because it was far too dark and had mountains made of ice.

Over many years blasts from fiery Muspell melted the mountains of Niflheim. The melting of the ice released a thawing giant. The giant was named Ymir and he was the first. As the melting of the ice mountains continued a cow emerged. The cow fed on the salt from the ice and Ymir received nourishment from drinking the cow's milk. The already immense giant grew even larger. The cow continued to lick the ice and from continuous feeding, the cow released two more beings: God Buri and his goddess wife. God Buri and his wife birthed a son, Bor, who then himself had a son of his own. Odin, son of Bor, became king of the Gods

[...] In the Aboriginal tale, Ka-ro-ra dreamt of life forms to surround him and live among him. Ultimately Ka-ro-ra, together with his army of sons, wiped out Bandicoots from the land. His sons killed the first Kangaroo and the land was engulfed in honey cleansing the land for a new beginning. In the Norse myth of creation Gods emerged from frosted mountains. The God king used the dismembered body of a giant to create a colorful Earth that flourished with plants. Odin, the God king, then created man and woman. [...]


[...] Cosmic creation myths across cultures Cosmic Creation Myths Across Cultures How the Earth, plants, and creatures came to be is highly dependent on who is being asked. Across cultures spanning the entire globe is a vast collection of tales all depicting a very different story of the creation of Earth and of its inhabitants. Norse Myth of Creation According to Norse Mythology, what is referred to as the planet Earth was once Ginnungagap. Ginnungagap is the Great Emptiness. South of Gunnunugagp was the firey realm of Muspell. [...]


[...] Yggdrasil, the great tree, became known as the tree of life. Aboriginal Creation Myth Similar to the Norse myth of creation, the Aboriginal land, Il-ba- lint-ja, was a dark and lonely place. Within the darkness of Il-ba-lint-ja stood a tall pole that stretched from the virgin ground to the heavens. At the bottom of the pole laid Ka-ro-ra, asleep. Although he lay in darkness he dreamt vivid and colorful images. His dreams of Bandicoots were so lifelike that as they escaped from his body and entered Il-ba-lint-ja. [...]

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