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Philosophy of Motion: Newtonian thoughts and interpretations of Aristotelian traditions within the natural philosophy

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  1. Introduction
  2. Overview of Ancient and Modern Thoughts on Motion
  3. Comparison of Modern Philosophical Thoughts and Ancient Philosophical Thoughts
  4. Conclusion

The post-Newtonian world assumes the motion to be related to locomotion of bodies in space and usually is associated with physics. Philosophy, on the other hand, shows that this is a relative recent understanding of motion. Philosophy argues that prior to the scientific revolution; motion was a broader and mysterious category, which applies to moral and physical movements.

Presenting fresh interpretations of key figures of western thoughts like Plato, Aristotle, Newton and others, motion has been of great importance within philosophy and science development, especially in the relation between God and motion. For instance, the traditional doctrine of God, according to Aristotle, understands divine as the ?unmoved mover." However, the most recent philosophical thoughts suggest that, for God to be involved in cosmos, the divine must be subject to motion. Arguments are that while God is beyond all qualification of change, motion is, therefore, a means of perfect creation and participation of God's eternal life.

[...] Comparison of Modern Philosophical Thoughts and Ancient Philosophical Thoughts IV. Conclusion Introduction The post-Newtonian world assumes the motion to be related to locomotion of bodies in space and usually is associated with physics. Philosophy, on the other hand, shows that this is a relative recent understanding of motion. Philosophy argues that prior to the scientific revolution; motion was a broader and mysterious category, which applies to moral and physical movements. Presenting fresh interpretations of key figures of western thoughts like Plato, Aristotle, Newton and others, motion has been of great importance within philosophy and science development, especially in the relation between God and motion. [...]


[...] Newton clarified the principle of inertia and incorporated it within three laws of motion. The laws were unchanging and motionless principles of reality. Scientists were now able to predict every motion of nature as Newton's ability to encapsulate the nature within the mathematical formula and bring consensus through infinite and identical experiments was meant to bring nature under control. Newton contributed a lot to the natural philosophy, especially in the understanding of motion. However, Newton's works are said to display lifelong interest in Biblical interpretations, prophesy, Christology and alchemy. [...]


[...] This, according to Newton, was a rejection of the divine will of power and freedom to change the constant laws of nature (Wilson 27). In deed, modern philosophy identifies the purpose of determining true forces from their causes, effects and differences, as well as determining from motion, their causes and effects whether true or apparent. For modern philosophical thought, reality becomes deeper than experience among which scientists could establish, thus the total commitment to establishing geometry within mechanics and experimental practices. [...]


[...] According to this premise, motion is not due to the nature of the body and thus violent in that the cause of its motion must be from without. There is a conflict between the modern and ancient philosophical thoughts such that modern thoughts describe the motion as the outcome of competitive conflicts rather than outcomes of participative co- operation between movers and inner, passive principles of change. For modern thoughts, motion is a mere product of ontological basic resistances as well as competition between the internal and external forces. The ancient thoughts see the modern philosophical arguments of the alteration change of motion as violent. [...]


[...] Aristotle's principle ?whatever is moved is moved by another? is present throughout the hierarchy of motion and is applicable at every level. The principle entails that the motion of inanimate bodies is never explicable with reference to the body alone such that they are not self-movers since they are necessarily moved by others in being moved. This implies that, for Aristotle, the universe is not a series of autonomous bodies whose motions require no explanation outside themselves. A crucial exteriority is present as motion originates in another. [...]

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