Search icone
Search and publish your papers

Public Law -The Human Rights Act 1998

Or download with : a doc exchange

About the author

Prof
Level
General public
Study
educational...
School/University
Harvard

About the document

Published date
Language
documents in English
Format
pdf
Type
case study
Pages
4 pages
Level
General public
Accessed
0 times
Validated by
Committee Oboolo.com
0 Comment
Rate this document
  1. Introduction
  2. The Human Rights Act 1998
  3. Courts and the Parliament
  4. Conclusion

Protection of human rights has been the focus of many governments and states in the world. The United Nations, for instance, has put in place a number of rules and regulations that revolve around human rights and which all members should adhere. The United Kingdom is one of the states that have continuously upheld the practice of protection of human rights through various acts and laws on the issue. The UK can talk of the Magna Carta and the Bill of Rights (1689) when explaining her efforts in the field of protection of human rights. It was only after the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that the idea of protection of human rights became international (Hoffman & Rowe, 2010). Britain was among the stakeholders who came up with the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). The main objective of this convention was enforcing the rights contained in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. However, this convention did not consider the local needs of the people, as they had to move to Strasbourg, where the European Court of Human Rights was, to claim protection or to express their grievances (Hoffman & Rowe, 2010). This called for the need to have an internal system that would attend to various human rights issues in the UK. These developments led to the enactment of The Human Rights Act 1998 that would consider the factors above.

[...] The main objective of this convention was enforcing the rights contained in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. However, this convention did not consider the local needs of the people, as they had to move to Strasbourg, where the European Court of Human Rights was, to claim protection or to express their grievances (Hoffman & Rowe, 2010). This called for the need to have an internal system that would attend to various human rights issues in the UK. These developments led to the enactment of The Human Rights Act 1998 that would consider the factors above. [...]


[...] Edinburgh: Thomson/W. Green. Allen, T. (2005). Property and The Human Rights Act 1998. Oxford: Hart. PUBLIC LAW Swindells, H. (1999). Family law and the Human Rights Act 1998. Bristol: Family Law. [...]


[...] However, The Human Rights Act outlines the responsibilities of all individuals in the protection of human rights. The act even gives the limits that individuals should not exceed even if they have some of their rights. For instance, the court has the mandate of limiting the right and freedom of speech and expression if it will lead to violence or incitement. The courts do not undermine the role of parliament of enacting laws but rather ensure that all the laws are compatible with human rights. [...]

Similar documents you may be interested in reading.

The Relationship between international law of human rights and international law applicable to...

 Law & contracts   |  International   |  Presentation   |  09/29/2010   |   .doc   |   9 pages

Human Rights Law: Essay on the Human Rights Act

 Law & contracts   |  Other law subjects   |  Presentation   |  09/29/2010   |   .doc   |   4 pages

Top sold for educational studies

Williams Act and takeover defences in the United States

 Social studies   |  Educational studies   |  Case study   |  05/13/2014   |   .doc   |   2 pages

La Celestina in its cultural and historical context

 Social studies   |  Educational studies   |  Case study   |  06/18/2013   |   .doc   |   3 pages