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Arranged marriages: the differences between American and Indian marriages

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  1. Marriage in the United States
  2. Marriage in India

Marriage, which is the bonding of two individuals usually for the rest of their lives, can occur in many ways. In some cultures, such as that of the United States, men and women decide on their own whom they would like to marry. This type of system is representative of American culture in general, which is very independent and relies upon the self. In other countries such as India, people are more concerned about the unity and name of the family rather than the reputation of just one individual. In India, outlooks on marriage vary greatly from that of the United States. Indian customs and traditions still follow the concept of arranged marriage, which is the usual form of marriage in India even to this day.

[...] Arranged marriages: the differences between American and Indian marriages Marriage, which is the bonding of two individuals usually for the rest of their lives, can occur in many ways. In some cultures, such as that of the United States, men and women decide on their own whom they would like to marry. This type of system is representative of American culture in general, which is very independent and relies upon the self. In other countries such as India, people are more concerned about the unity and name of the family rather than the reputation of just one individual. [...]


[...] This may seem unusual considering that the Indian couple has never met each other and seems unlikely to get along, but it proves that the parents do a careful and efficient job in selecting the mate. Indians believe that a marriage based on love is unacceptable because the couple is too young to consider the costs and benefits of the marriages as well as their parent's can. Indians tend to marry very early, and their rates of marriage are higher than rates in countries such as the United States. [...]


[...] Young people below the age of 20 are usually not wise enough to select the right partner and the help of their parents is therefore essential. Also, rather than looking at love, parents look at caste and sub-caste. According to Chekki, the selection of a mate, the real unit of endogamy is not the caste but the sub-caste? (Chekki 708). In India, one's caste determines one's social standing in society, and it is therefore essential that a couple joined together has the same or nearly the same standing. [...]


[...] Once they are married, sex outside of marriage is condemned just as it would be in any other society, although possibly by means that are less harsh. Indian marriages are obviously very different from American marriages in that they are arranged. In most cases, the families of the individuals getting married find a suitable bride or groom. There are always many considerations to be made before the family can accept a person as a suitable match, such as their caste or sub-caste, their financial standing, their physical appearance, their dialogue, and their future ambitions. [...]

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